Joseph Gordon-Levitt partner

28 [M4M][Dating][Friendship][Dallas, TX, Anywhere] Looking for a real connection.

2020.11.11 14:40 AuthenticSpace 28 [M4M][Dating][Friendship][Dallas, TX, Anywhere] Looking for a real connection.

This is going to be a huge wall of text, so, I'm sorry/you're welcome?

This pandemic sucks, the world is on fire, and we need human connection now more than ever. I have always believed in the value of relationships and HATE the "love yourself before you can love others" rugged individualist mentality. It's totally false and damaging. Human connection is how we grow, learn, introspect, and become better people. It's how we get this sense of reality, security, grounding and strong attachments.

I understand that relationships come and go, and lifetime bonds are extremely hard to form. I'm not saying that I don't want a lifetime bond if I can have it, but even if we're together for just a moment in time and it makes us better, gives us belonging, purpose and closure, then I guess that's not so bad. Where it gets messed up is when the other person feels forgotten.

I don't want that. I don't want to get ghosted and forgotten about.

Okay, enough rambling. Lemme tell you about me in concrete terms:

I'm a disabled dude in Texas trying to survive the pandemic and basic existence, to be honest. I'm a proud leftist, and nothing is more terrifying than watching Capitalism grind people down for profit, and have people defend this system.

I love video games, reading, film, tv and doggos.
Games I'm currently playing: For Honor, Star Wars Battlefront 2.

I love a game with a good story, so games like Red Dead Redemption 1 and 2 hold special places in my heart. Don't even talk to me about The Last of Us Part 2 unless you hate it as much as I do.

Favorite book by far is The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller. If you love this book, we're already soulmates. Some other faves are I'll Give you the Sun by Jandy Nelson and Red, White and Royal Blue by Casey Mcquinston.

I have way too many films I love that have made an impact on me. I LOVE dissecting films and seeing what works and what doesn't, especially with horror films. My fave horrors are Hereditary and Midsommar, tied closely with The Babadook. Mysterious Skin is one of my favorite haunting books and films. Joseph Gordon Levitt gave his best performance ever, and you can't convince me otherwise.

TV is the same as film. I'm always watching something. To be honest, if you don't accept that Bob's Burgers is my comfort show that I watch to nap, for comfort, and literally never get tired of it, we're going to have a rough time. I absolutely adore Bojack Horseman, The Good Place, Crazy Ex Girlfriend, The Boys, and SO many others.
Media is something I've lived with and grown up by for most of my life. So all of these things I consume and have listed resonate with me very strongly. This is how I relate to the world. I will admit, though, that it does make it harder when I find fellow fans of this stuff and they don't see what I see, or understand why I see it. It's almost kind of alienating.

I struggle with alienation a lot. In many social groups and situations, there's always that moment that others me, and it's impossible for me to go back. It could be talking about drinking culture, hookup culture, whatever tells me that "Oh, I'm not like these people" and it's kind of this instant assumed rejection. So I've struggled a lot with that in my adult life.

I have trauma all over the place, from medical, sexual, emotional, you name it. I almost don't know where I end and the trauma begins. But I'm learning and trying to understand it. Luckily for me, I'm a social sciences nerd. So all of this stuff about relationships, empathy, psychology are totally my jam.
Speaking of, I am BIG into attachment theory. I'm an anxious style, so that means I really need stability, security, consistency in my partners. I'm getting better at realizing if those needs aren't going to be met, and then it's time for me to bail. So if you can't meet those needs, or any needs I list, it's cool and I get it, but we're probably not going to mesh.

What I want, more than anything, is to find my partner, that person who understands me, reciprocates my feelings, sees the value and worth in me, and needs me as much as I need him. We grow together, we help each other, we affirm and love, and challenge. Someone good natured and easy going, calm, stable and emotionally present. I wanna find this person, have all the bomb-ass sex, have a wonderful life together of laughter and love, and eventually raise a dog family with. THIS IS MY TOP PRIORITY. So I treat conversations and dating with a very mindful perspective, and do my best to avoid situations that aren't going to give me what I'm looking for. Nothing personal. I just don't want to play games and have to make guesses as to who you are and what you're thinking and feeling.

If you're reading this and you're like "Ay, this person is dope af. But I'm not gonna be boyfriend material" then that's totally cool! If you think you're friend material, please please please still reach out. I will take any opportunity to find kindred spirits that I can.

If you've read all of this and you're interested, first of all I appreciate you reading. I know it's a gigantic wall of text but hopefully formatted in the least offensive way possible. I'd love to hear from you and see where things go.
If you want a good sense of me, beyond this, check out Twitter as I mainly lurk and get downvoted to hell on Reddit. My twitter is Disgaybled, and I'm kinda obsessed with it. I also have pics there!
Again, thanks for reading. You're the best. Even if this isn't your thing, I really hope you find what you're looking for.
submitted by AuthenticSpace to r4r [link] [comments]


2020.10.22 21:11 AuthenticSpace 28 [M4M][Dating][Friendship][Dallas, TX, Anywhere] Looking for a real connection.

So now that we have a sub where we can share more emotional content, I thought maybe I'd write some more about me, in addition to the other post I made. This is going to be a huge wall of text, so, I'm sorry/you're welcome?

This pandemic sucks, the world is on fire, and we need human connection now more than ever. I have always believed in the value of relationships and HATE the "love yourself before you can love others" rugged individualist mentality. It's totally false and damaging. Human connection is how we grow, learn, introspect, and become better people. It's how we get this sense of reality, security, grounding and strong attachments.

I understand that relationships come and go, and lifetime bonds are extremely hard to form. I'm not saying that I don't want a lifetime bond if I can have it, but even if we're together for just a moment in time and it makes us better, gives us belonging, purpose and closure, then I guess that's not so bad. Where it gets messed up is when the other person feels forgotten.

I don't want that. I don't want to get ghosted and forgotten about.

Okay, enough rambling. Lemme tell you about me in concrete terms:

I'm a disabled dude in Texas trying to survive the pandemic and basic existence, to be honest. I'm a proud leftist, and nothing is more terrifying than watching Capitalism grind people down for profit, and have people defend this system.

I love video games, reading, film, tv and doggos.
Games I'm currently playing: For Honor, Star Wars Battlefront 2.

I love a game with a good story, so games like Red Dead Redemption 1 and 2 hold special places in my heart. Don't even talk to me about The Last of Us Part 2 unless you hate it as much as I do.

Favorite book by far is The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller. If you love this book, we're already soulmates. Some other faves are I'll Give you the Sun by Jandy Nelson and Red, White and Royal Blue by Casey Mcquinston.

I have way too many films I love that have made an impact on me. I LOVE dissecting films and seeing what works and what doesn't, especially with horror films. My fave horrors are Hereditary and Midsommar, tied closely with The Babadook. Mysterious Skin is one of my favorite haunting books and films. Joseph Gordon Levitt gave his best performance ever, and you can't convince me otherwise.

TV is the same as film. I'm always watching something. To be honest, if you don't accept that Bob's Burgers is my comfort show that I watch to nap, for comfort, and literally never get tired of it, we're going to have a rough time. I absolutely adore Bojack Horseman, The Good Place, Crazy Ex Girlfriend, The Boys, and SO many others.
Media is something I've lived with and grown up by for most of my life. So all of these things I consume and have listed resonate with me very strongly. This is how I relate to the world. I will admit, though, that it does make it harder when I find fellow fans of this stuff and they don't see what I see, or understand why I see it. It's almost kind of alienating.

I struggle with alienation a lot. In many social groups and situations, there's always that moment that others me, and it's impossible for me to go back. It could be talking about drinking culture, hookup culture, whatever tells me that "Oh, I'm not like these people" and it's kind of this instant assumed rejection. So I've struggled a lot with that in my adult life.

I have trauma all over the place, from medical, sexual, emotional, you name it. I almost don't know where I end and the trauma begins. But I'm learning and trying to understand it. Luckily for me, I'm a social sciences nerd. So all of this stuff about relationships, empathy, psychology are totally my jam.
Speaking of, I am BIG into attachment theory. I'm an anxious style, so that means I really need stability, security, consistency in my partners. I'm getting better at realizing if those needs aren't going to be met, and then it's time for me to bail. So if you can't meet those needs, or any needs I list, it's cool and I get it, but we're probably not going to mesh.

What I want, more than anything, is to find my partner, that person who understands me, reciprocates my feelings, sees the value and worth in me, and needs me as much as I need him. We grow together, we help each other, we affirm and love, and challenge. Someone good natured and easy going, calm, stable and emotionally present. I wanna find this person, have all the bomb-ass sex, have a wonderful life together of laughter and love, and eventually raise a dog family with. THIS IS MY TOP PRIORITY. So I treat conversations and dating with a very mindful perspective, and do my best to avoid situations that aren't going to give me what I'm looking for. Nothing personal. I just don't want to play games and have to make guesses as to who you are and what you're thinking and feeling.

If you're reading this and you're like "Ay, this person is dope af. But I'm not gonna be boyfriend material" then that's totally cool! If you think you're friend material, please please please still reach out. I will take any opportunity to find kindred spirits that I can.

If you've read all of this and you're interested, first of all I appreciate you reading. I know it's a gigantic wall of text but hopefully formatted in the least offensive way possible. I'd love to hear from you and see where things go.
If you want a good sense of me, beyond this, check out Twitter as I mainly lurk and get downvoted to hell on Reddit. My twitter is Disgaybled, and I'm kinda obsessed with it. I also have pics there!
Again, thanks for reading. You're the best. Even if this isn't your thing, I really hope you find what you're looking for.
submitted by AuthenticSpace to dateademi [link] [comments]


2020.10.12 20:42 jonisantucho Oscar Watch - Post Venice/TIFF/NYFF Edition

Several months ago, right after the last Academy Awards, I posted a long, long, long list of possible contenders that had prospects to fight for the next Oscars. It was a time of hope, of looking forward, and of positivity.
Then, COVID-19 happened.
And now, we find ourselves in a year that may change the movie industry forever, with the lack of safety of theaters in times of a pandemic accelerating the switch of mainstream audiences to streaming and VOD. These are times where some people are beginning to wonder, even after they pushed the eligibility date for two more months, why the Academy doesn’t cancel next year’s Oscars. And in this rocky terrain, we lost many contenders. Fire up the Hunger Games cannons, because these are some casualties of the season (so far).
Launched to 2021: Annette, Benedetta, Deep Water, Dune, In the Heights, King Richard, Last Night in Soho, Memoria, Nightmare Alley, Passing, Red, White and Water, Raya and the Last Dragon, The Last Duel, The Power of the Dog, Tick, Tick… Boom!, West Side Story.
Unknown status / missing in action: After Yang, Blonde, Breaking News in Yuba County, C’mon C’mon, Next Goal Wins, Stillwater, The French Dispatch, The Humans, The Tragedy of Macbeth, The Eyes of Tammy Faye, Those Who Wish Me Dead.
But even if this year isn’t as loaded with clear awards candidates, there are plenty of movies that are already drawing buzz for an Oscar season that started brewing a month ago, with the kickoff of the Venice Film Festival, and will go on for six and a half more months, when the Academy Awards take place on April 25, 2021. It’s gonna be a long, weird and rocky season, which is gonna be great to see in terms of the narratives that are coming up.
-Ammonite (trailer): When people were betting on the likelier contenders of this year, many people pointed in the direction of Francis Lee’s period drama, with previous Best Actress winner Kate Winslet and constant nominee Saoirse Ronan. Going into the premiere at Toronto, people had their eyes set in this queer romance between a paleontologist and a young wife in the coasts of England during the 19th century. But then, some things happened. First, Winslet started her promotion of the movie by talking about her regret for working with Woody Allen and Roman Polanski that sounded unconvincing to the ominous Film Twitter. Then, another queer period drama, Mona Fastvold’s The World to Come, started to take the attention away at Venice. And finally, the movie premiered. The reaction? Cold. Critics came out mixed with the movie, with many of them comparing it negatively to last year’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire, and saying that it’s too dull and alienating. Does that mean that all is lost? Not exactly. While the movie (which, considering the genre, really needs critics' support to get into the Best Picture category) has been dismissed, the acting by Winslet and Ronan has been received positively. Now that so many other contenders have been dropping out of the year, they might get some room to campaign from a (social) distance.
-Another Round (trailer): Speaking of TIFF premieres, a film that had a better time at the Canadian festival was the reunion between director Thomas Vinterberg and star Mads Mikkelsen, who reunited years after making the stirring drama The Hunt (not the one with Betty Gilpin carrying a bad political satire, the one about a Danish teacher wrongly accused of sexual abuse). This time, the material is lighter, being a dramedy about four teachers who decide to test out a theory about how people can live and work a little better if they increase the level of alcohol in their blood. Critics really liked the way the movie dealt with alcoholism, and Toronto audiences made it a runner up for the People’s Choice Award of the festival. In a year without so much exposure from other festivals, this Cannes 2020 selection could make a candidate for the Best International Film category.
-Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (trailer): Surprise, new Borat film! While Sacha Baron Cohen made headlines several times this year because of stunts that people assumed were about a second season of Who is America?, the Internet was shocked when, in early September, it was confirmed that it was actually a very niiiiice return from the journalist character that made him famous, shot during quarantine. In a matter of weeks after the reveal, the sequel got sold to Amazon Prime and got a release date for October 23. Why so soon? Well, apparently the movie, which got him in trouble with Rudy Giuliani and other people, is about Borat taking his daughter on a road trip to give her as a bride to VP Mike Pence. Even if this movie doesn’t manage to achieve the feats of the 2006 movie (which got a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination, let’s remember), it will help Baron Cohen’s image a lot, because it will come a week after his big Oscar play.
-Cherry: While everybody knows them mostly because of their contributions to the MCU, directors Joe and Anthony Russo and actor Tom Holland are trying to branch out together. Now Apple has bought into their efforts, paying more than 40 million dollars to acquire their new crime drama, about the life of former Army medic Nico Walker, who started robbing banks after his days in Iraq left him with PTSD and a pill addiction. Will Holland manage this time to escape from the shadow of “oh, jeez, Mr. Stark” Spider-Man before Chaos Walking or the Uncharted movie come out? That’s a question for another day.
-Da 5 Bloods (trailer): Talk about timing. Merely days after the country was mobilized by the police brutality that continues to divide the United States, Spike Lee premiered his new war drama on Netflix. In a vibrant, disjointed but passionate portrait of four African American veterans who return to Vietnam to search for their fallen leader and some treasure, Lee struck gold yet again with his usual fans, even though the moving of the Oscar ceremony threatened to make it harder to remind Academy voters about this movie. However, with an astounding performance from Delroy Lindo (who is confirmed to be campaigned in the Best Actor category) and a supporting turn from Chadwick Boseman which got reframed with the news of his bravery in life and death, this has what it takes to fight for a spot in the Best Picture lineup.
-Everybody’s Talking About Jamie (trailer): When it became clear that quarantine wasn’t gonna be a breeze, the first movie in consideration wise enough to move a little further ahead in the calendar was this adaptation of the hit West End production about a gay British teenager who dreams of becoming a drag queen and get his family and schoolmates to accept his sexuality. With a release date on February 26, 20th Century Studios (man, it’s weird to not use Fox in that name) hopes to strike gold, with a cast that mixes young unknowns, familiar names (Sharon Horgan, Sarah Lancashire and my boy Ralph Ineson) and the previously nominated legend that is Richard E. Grant (who is playing a former drag queen named Loco Chanelle), now taking advantage of the move of other musicals like Annette, In The Heights and West Side Story. I mean, this has at the very least some Golden Globes nods in the bag.
-French Exit: Before its premiere as the closing film of the NYFF, many pundits were expecting this surreal comedy to be somewhat of a comeback for past Best Actress nominee Michelle Pfeiffer, who here plays a close to penniless widow who moves to Paris with her son (Lucas Hedges) and cat, who also happens to be her reincarnated husband (Tracy Letts). However, the first reactions for the film adaptation of the Patrick deWitt novel were all over the place, with some people feeling cold by the execution of the weirdness and others being won over. Still, everybody had good things to say about Michelle Pfeiffer’s performance, but after the mixed reception to the rest of Azazel Jacobs’ film she really would need a lot of critics support to get anywhere near the Best Actress category. With a release date on February 12, it seems that Sony Pictures Classics is skipping the critics awards, and the distributor has a couple of big competitors above this one.
-Good Joe Bell: Every year, there are movies with big stars that go to festivals full of hope for praises and awards. Some of them work and go on, others don’t and get forgotten about. Mark Wahlberg tried to remind people that he occasionally is a good actor with a true life drama where he plays a father who decides to walk across America to raise awareness about bullying after his son, tormented for being gay, commits suicide. The film by Reinaldo Marcus Green premiered at TIFF, and the reaction was… not great. Some critics defended it, but most saw it as a flawed, baity product starring a man with a history of hate. Still, it got bought by a distributor: Solstice Studios, a new player in the game which just released its first movie, Unhinged (yup, the one about Russell Crowe road raging). While they paid 20 million dollars for Good Joe Bell, it’s clear that this won’t get near the Oscar telecast.
-Hillbilly Elegy: While many movies this year have some level of anticipation, Film Twitter is bracing for this movie in the “is this gonna be the next Green Book?” way. Ron Howard’s adaptation of J.D. Vance’s memoir about his low income life in a poor rural community in Ohio has many fearing about the overuse of tropes involving what’s called white trash porn, but rarely, Netflix has kept silent about this release. Even though it has Oscar bridesmaids Glenn Close (7 nominations) and Amy Adams (6 nominations), the streamer has not even released a photo of the movie, which supposedly will come out in November. And if you want another bad omen, take a look at the lower levels of this list by a familiar voice.
-I’m Thinking of Ending Things (trailer): Speaking of Netflix, did you know that there is a new Charlie Kaufman there, right now? While his adaptation of the dark novel by Iain Reid, seemingly about a woman (Jessie Buckley) who is taken by her boyfriend (Jesse Plemons) to meet his parents (Toni Collette and David Thewlis), got the usual reception of confusion and praise that follows his movies, the release was followed for what befalls most of the Netflix original movies: a couple of days in the Top 10, and then it fell into the void. While Buckley and Plemons deliver great work in this demented, melancholic story, it’s hard to see this movie getting anything else than a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination for Charlie. And that’s a long shot.
-I’m Your Woman: Following the little seen but critically acclaimed Miss Stevens and Fast Color, Julia Hart started 2020 with a Disney+ adaptation of the YA book Stargirl, and now she follows it with a drama for Amazon that will have its world premiere as the opening film of the AFI fest on October 15. In this movie, Rachel Brosnahan hopes to translate her TV success with The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel to the big screen, playing a woman in the ‘70s that has to go on the run with her kid due to her husband’s crimes.
-Judas and the Black Messiah (trailer): Even if this doesn’t end up winning any awards, it has a real shot at being the best trailer of 2020. Formerly titled Jesus Was My Homeboy, this biographical drama by Shaka King tells the tale of two men: Fred Hampton (Kaluuya), an activist and Black Panther leader, and William O’Neal (Stanfield), the FBI agent sent to infiltrate the party and arrest him. While the trailer for this movie promised a release “only in theaters”, we shall see if Warner Bros backs down from that fight.
-Let Them All Talk: While we’re on the subject of Warner Bros, we have to mention what’s happening with HBO Max. While the start of the streaming service hasn’t been good (I mean, there are still people confused about that name) and it lead to some people assume will cause many firings, it has begun to make some buzzed titles on TV, like Close Enough, Raised by Wolves and the remains of the DC Universe failed streaming service. Now, to make a mark in the movie business, the streamer has a new Steven Soderbergh movie, a comedy that stars Meryl Streep as a celebrated author that takes her friends (Candice Bergen, Dianne Wiest) and her nephew (Lucas Hedges) in a cruise to find fun and come to terms with the past, while he flirts with a literary agent (Gemma Chan). While it doesn’t have a date yet, it’s confirmed to release in 2020, and at least we know that it can’t be worse than The Laundromat.
-Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom: While the expectations for the next film adaptation of an August Wilson acclaimed play were already high, the tragic death of Chadwick Boseman made this Netflix release one of the most anticipated movies of the season, considering this is his final movie. While past Supporting Actress winner Viola Davis takes the lead playing blues singer Ma Rainey in this tale of a heated recording session with her bandmates, her agent and her producer in 1927, Chadwick Boseman has a turn as the trumpeter Levee that was already being considered for awards, and now has even more people waiting to see. The thing is that one of the biggest competitions for Boseman this year will be Boseman himself, for his already acclaimed supporting turn on Da 5 Bloods, also released by Netflix. While the streamer will have to decide which of Chadwick’s performances will get the bigger campaign, this film by director George C. Wolfe has a cushy date set for December 18, and Viola is gunning hard for this movie to win.
-Mank (trailer): As you may have noticed by now, Netflix has a lot of plates spinning around this season, and this is the big one. After befriending the service with House of Cards and Mindhunter, David Fincher is going black and white to tackle a script by his late father Jack, about the making of the classic of classics, Citizen Kane. More specifically, the making of the script, with previous Oscar winner Gary Oldman playing the lead role of screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz, while accompanied by Amanda Seyfried, Lily Collins, Tuppence Middleton, Charles Dance and Tom Burke. After watching the first trailer of his satire of 1930’s Hollywood (that will release on streaming on December 4), it’s clear that this is gonna be catnip to old Academy voters, and it would be really hard for this to miss the Best Picture line up. Unless it’s a complete cinematic disaster, Mank is bank.
-Minari (trailer): While the last edition of Sundance took place in January, quarantine makes you feel like it took place two years ago. This year, the big winner of the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award in the US Dramatic Competition was a dramedy by Lee Isaac Chung, about a Korean family in the ‘80s who suddenly gets moved by their father (Steven Yeun) to Arkansas, to start a farm. Even though the reviews have been great, distributor A24 hasn’t really had a big, Oscar nominated hit for the last couple of years, and the COVID-19 crisis made them delay all their releases. But when we were ready to write this off, a new trailer for the movie came out, confirming that it’s in the game of this awards season. Maybe the pandemic will be of help to A24, considering that one of the reasons they haven’t had success is that they divided their attention into too many releases, and ended up getting not much. This time, they are betting all on Lee who, even if this doesn’t go anywhere, also has a new gig coming up as the director of the live action remake of Your Name.
-News of the World (sneak peek): So much of this year has felt like a game of chicken between a virus and movie studios. While many movies chose to skip this year altogether, Universal remains firm (for now) with its plans to open a wide movie on Christmas Day, with a Western that reunites Paul Greengrass and Tom Hanks in an enticing premise. In this drama based on Paulette Jiles’ novel, Hanks plays a traveling newsreader in the aftermath of the American Civil War, who is tasked with reuniting an orphaned girl with her living relatives. While the first sneak peek of the movie looks promising, the future is still in the air.
-Nomadland (trailer): While the world burns around Hollywood, Searchlight is betting big on Chloe Zhao’s new film. Using the strategy of taking the spotlight while the rest of the contenders is uncertain about how or when to be released, the indie drama began its journey at Venice, with critics raving about the story of a woman (two-time Oscar winner Frances McDormand) who, after losing everything in the Great Recession, embarks on a journey through the American West, living as a van-dwelling modern-day nomad. At the end of the fest, the movie won the coveted Golden Lion. To put that into perspective, the last three winners of the award were past Best Picture nominees The Shape of Water, Roma and Joker, with The Shape of Water (also distributed by Searchlight) also winning the big prize. After drawing critical acclaim following its virtual showing on TIFF and NYFF, Nomadland seems like the first lock in the Best Picture line up. Still, there are obstacles ahead. Will Zhao break the disappointment of the last few years, when deserving candidates for Best Director got blocked by the likes of Adam McKay and Todd Phillips? And will McDormand manage to get near a third Oscar, following a recent win for Three Billboards in Ebbing, Missouri? Time will tell.
-On the Rocks (trailer): While she hasn’t been near the Oscars for a while, Sofia Coppola is still a name that draws attention. This time, she opened the NYFF with a dramedy about a young mother (Rashida Jones) who reunites with her playboy father (Bill Murray, also reuniting with Sofia after Lost in Translation) on an adventure through New York to find out if her husband (Marlon Wayans) is cheating on her. The consensus seems to be that, while light and not near her best work, it’s still a fun and breezy movie, with a very good turn by Murray. While many would assume that this A24 production will disappear into the abyss when it releases on Apple TV+ on October 23, the dropping out of many candidates gives the movie a chance to, at least, fight for some Golden Globes.
-One Night in Miami (sneak peek): Following her recent Oscar and Emmy wins for If Beale Street Could Talk and Watchmen, Regina King is still striking hard, and this time, she’s doing it as a director. For her big screen debut as a filmmaker, she chose to adapt Kemp Powers’ play that dramatizes a real meeting on February 25, 1964, when Muhammad Ali (Eli Goree) followed an iconic win with a hangout session with Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir), Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.) and Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge). Opening at Venice, the film received glowing reviews, with many praising King (even though some said that the movie doesn’t fully translate the play to the film medium) and the actors’ performances, especially Ben-Adir and Odom Jr. (who, it should be said, also wrote an original song for the end credits of the movie, which could help his Oscar chances). Amazon Prime is hoping that this is their big contender this year, with plans of a theatrical release on Christmas and a streaming release on January 15. Judging by the praise this got at festival season, it has a chance to go a long way.
-Over the Moon (trailer): In a year with not that many contenders for Best Animated Feature, Netflix is betting on a musical adventure directed by the legendary Glen Keane, a classic Disney animator who recently won an Oscar for Best Animated Short for co-directing Dear Basketball. While our expectations were lowered by the first trailer for the movie, centered around a Chinese girl who builds a rocket ship and blasts off to the Moon in hopes of meeting a legendary Goddess, it’s still safe to assume that it has a shot at being nominated for something. Netflix also hopes that you like its big candidate for Best Original Song, which really, really sounds like a Disney ballad.
-Pieces of a Woman: While this year doesn’t have the amount of surprise contenders that a regular Oscar season usually has, we still have some movies that sneaked through festival season. The first one was the new, somber drama by Hungarian director Kornél Mundruczó, known for the doggy uprising pic White God, and the not-so-well-received sci-fi Jupiter’s Moon. This time, we follow a woman (Vanessa Kirby) whose life is torn apart after a home birth at the hands of a flustered midwife (Molly Parker) ends in tragedy, and then leads to a court battle that also makes her confront her husband (Shia LaBeouf) and her domineering mother (Ellen Burstyn). While the movie had mixed reactions, Kirby had plenty of raves in her direction, particularly concerning her performance during a 25-minute birth sequence that is said to be brutal. That brutality paid off, though, because Kirby ended up winning Best Actress at Venice, and Netflix bought the movie, which also has Martin Scorsese as an executive producer. If the Academy wants to crown a new face in the scene, Kirby is the one who will be targeted, following her acclaimed turn in The Crown and her supporting roles in blockbusters like Mission Impossible: Fallout and Hobbs & Shaw.
-Promising Young Woman (trailer): When theaters started to close because of the pandemic, Universal started the push of their movies going straight to VOD, with titles including Trolls World Tour and Never Rarely Sometimes Always. However, there was a title that was supposed to premiere in April, and then suddenly disappeared from existence. It was the directorial debut of actress Emerald Fennell, who wrote a black comedy with touches of a thriller, centered on a woman in her thirties (Carey Mulligan) whose bright future was derailed by a traumatic event, and who’s now looking for revenge. While the reaction to its premiere at Sundance wasn’t enough to consider a Best Picture run, the twisted performance by Mulligan earned her the best praise since the last time she was nominated for an Oscar, a decade ago for An Education. Now, Focus Features is planning to open the movie at Christmas, and are positioning Carey for a run at Best Actress.
-Rebecca (trailer): When the news came out saying that Ben Wheatley would adapt Daphne du Maurier’s psychological thriller novel for Netflix, many were shocked. Some people considered the chance that this was an awards play by the cult director, who is doing the same work that earned Alfred Hitchcock his only Best Picture win. But seeing the trailer for this new version, with Lily James playing the newly married young woman who finds herself battling the shadow of her husband's (Armie Hammer) dead first wife Rebecca, we have to wonder if there’s a point to the existence of this remake. We will find out if there’s any awards chances for this movie on October 21, when it releases on streaming. Let’s hope that Kristin Scott Thomas has something to play with as Mrs. Danvers.
-Respect (trailer): Every year, there’s one or two actors who announce to the world “I want an Oscar” and campaign like their lives depended on it. Last time, it was Taron Egerton (accompanied by Elton John, who actually ended up winning another Oscar). This year, it is the turn of Jennifer Hudson, who is playing Aretha Franklin in a biopic directed by first timer Liesl Tommy, and who’s hoping that this attempt at awards ends up more like Dreamgirls than like Cats. She has been doing announcement trailers (a year in advance), quarantine tributes, award show tributes, and every possible thing to get the industry to notice that she’s playing Aretha. Hey, Rami Malek and Renee Zellweger did it in the last few years, why can’t she. With a release date of January 15, Hudson wants that gold.
-Soul (trailer): Disney may be the studio that suffered the biggest hit because of the pandemic. Their parks are a loss, most of their big productions had to stop because of quarantine, and theaters in many parts of the world are closed. After the failure of Tenet for Warner Bros. and the experiment of the mouse house of charging people 30 dollars to see Mulan (which didn’t work at all), many wondered if Disney was gonna delay the new production by Pixar, written and directed by Pete Docter, who brought Oscar gold to his home with Up and Inside Out. The movie, which centers on a teacher (Jamie Foxx) who dreams of becoming a jazz musician and, just as he’s about to get his big break, ends up getting into an accident that separates his soul from his body, had a lot of promise, but the speculation of lost money was also a concern. Finally, Disney decided to release the movie on Christmas, but only on Disney Plus, causing another failure for theaters, but assuring that Disney at least can get more subscribers to its streaming service. And the movie? Well, it just premiered at the London Film Festival, and the critics are saying it’s Pixar at its best, with praises going from the look, to the script by co-director Kemp Powers (who also wrote the play of One Night in Miami, so he has many chances for a nod), to the score by Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross and Jon Batiste. That means that it’s already a top contender to win Best Animated Feature, and this may not be the only category in which the movie is gonna get nominated.
-Supernova (trailer): If there’s a theme this year in terms of Oscar contenders, it might be dementia. One of the examples of this is a small road movie directed by Hairy Macqueen, which premiered to good reviews at the San Sebastian festival. This drama centers on a trip taken by Sam (Colin Firth) and Tusker (Stanley Tucci), partners for 20 years, who travel across England reuniting with friends and family, because Tusker was diagnosed with early onset dementia. While usually the big awards role is usually the one of the person who suffers the illnesses, some reviewers are calling Firth’s work as the supporting companion some of the best of his career. With Bleecker Street buying the rights for a US release, this is a little film that could still make some moves.
-Tenet (trailer): For the first five months of quarantine, the big narrative in the world of film was “Christopher Nolan is gonna save cinemas”. But after postponing the release of the mind bending actioner for months on end, creating big demands and expectations to theater owners, and finally releasing as the sacrificial lamb of Hollywood, Warner Bros ended up seeing the opposite effect. Even though Tom Cruise loved to be back at the movies, critics didn’t share enough excitement to make a spy movie that goes backwards worth the possibility of dying of coronavirus. The audiences didn’t show up as much, and those who did attend, mostly complained about the sound mixing and the plot. After all the sacrifice, it’s highly unlikely that Tenet goes beyond technical awards. Let’s start the “Travis Scott for Best Original Song” campaign now, before it’s too late.
-The Boys in the Band (trailer): The Ryan Murphy blank check for Netflix has been interesting to follow. On the one hand, we have his new TV shows, which go from not existing (The Politician), to alternate movie history that doesn’t know how alternate history works (Hollywood), to a challenge of how much TV will you stomach if Sarah Paulson and other middle aged actresses are campy in it (Ratched). And now, we are seeing his producing hand over the movie side, which starts with the new film adaptation of the cult play from 1968, which was already a movie in 1970 and recently jumped to Broadway in 2018. The cast from the recent Broadway production (which includes Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto, Matt Bomer and Andrew Rannells) stars in Joe Mantello’s movie, telling the story of a group of gay friends in pre-Stonewall New York who reunite for a birthday party and end up revealing a lot of open wounds. While this movie got good reviews from critics, it kinda disappeared without a sound after beginning to stream on Netflix at the end of September. Unless the service wants to campaign for Golden Globes, this film is lost in the algorithm.
-The Devil All the Time (trailer): Another September release on Netflix was the new psychological thriller by Antonio Campos (Simon Killer, Christine) who didn’t manage to continue his streak of intense and terrifying character dramas with his messy adaptation of the dark novel by Donald Ray Pollock. Wasting a cast that includes Tom Holland, Sebastian Stan, Robert Pattinson, Mia Wasikowska, Eliza Scanlen, Bill Skarsgard, Jason Clarke and Riley Keough, this twisted period piece managed to stay for a while in the Top 10, but the reactions from critics were mixed, and audiences were busy asking what was happening with Pattinson’s Southern accent (which with The King makes two years in a row, baby). The many prognosticators who had hopes for an awards play moved on a while ago.
-The Father (trailer): It’s safe to say at this point that Anthony Hopkins is a lock for a Best Actor nomination at the next Oscars. After its premiere in Sundance, every prognosticator pointed in his direction, and for the next few months he swept praise for his harrowing portrayal of an old man grappling with his age as he develops dementia, causing pain to his beleaguered daughter (recent winner Olivia Colman, who also got praised). Sony Pictures Classics will make Florian Zeller’s adaptation of his acclaimed play its big contender of the season, using Hopkins (who this year got a nom for The Two Popes) as a starter to also get Colman, Zeller and the movie nominated.
-The Human Voice (trailer): And speaking of Sony Pictures Classics, it’s almost safe to say that they have another Oscar in the bag this year. That’s because they just bought Pedro Almodóvar’s short film, his English-speaking debut that is an adaptation of the play by Jean Cocteau. In his version (that was acclaimed by critics after premiering in Venice), Tilda Swinton plays the woman waiting at the end of a phone, expecting to hear from his ex-lover who abandoned her. Considering how the competition for Best Live Action Short Film has become somewhat lacking in the last few years (I mean, have you seen Skin), this should be an easy award to win, especially considering how beloved Almodóvar is in the Academy, which nominated him this year for the great Pain and Glory.
-The Life Ahead: While we’re talking about legends, it’s time to talk about Sophia Loren. 16 years after her last leading role in a movie, the Italian icon returns with a drama that was bought by Netflix, who plans to campaign for her as Best Actress and for the movie in the Best International Film category. Directed by Edoardo Ponti (who is also Sophia’s son), this movie centers on a Holocaust survivor who takes in a 12-year-old boy who recently robbed her, in a contemporary adaptation of Romain Gary’s novel The Life Before Us. Netflix has set a date for November 13 to release this movie, and the campaign seems to be about the narrative of seeing Loren winning another Oscar 60 years after she won her first one for Two Women, by Vittorio De Sica.
-The Midnight Sky: Based on the novel Good Morning, Midnight, this collaboration between George Clooney and Netflix is once again making us ask one thing. Are we gonna get the director Clooney of Good Night and Good Luck, or are we gonna get the director Clooney of Leatherheads, The Ides of March, The Monuments Men and Suburbicon? Let’s hope he breaks his streak of blandness with this sci-fi story, which makes us think a little bit of Gravity: A lonely scientist in the Arctic (Clooney) races to stop a group of astronauts led by Felicity Jones from returning to a devastated Earth. With a release set for December, we have to hope that this is more than some Top 10 filler that will evaporate from existence in a week’s time.
-The Prom: In probably the biggest blank check of the Ryan Murphy deal with Netflix, this musical he’ll direct is based on the Tony-nominated show about a group of Broadway losers (Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman, Andrew Rannells and James “boo” Corden) who try to find a viral story to get back in the spotlight, and end up going to a town in Indiana to help a lesbian high school student who has been banned from bringing her girlfriend to the prom. While it’s clear that this December 11 release is gonna sweep the Golden Globes, the emptiness of this year compared to others could clear the way for some Oscar nominations, including Meryl and the obligatory original song added to a preexisting musical for easy clout.
-The Trial of the Chicago 7 (trailer): When it was announced that Paramount was selling Aaron Sorkin’s new movie to Netflix, some people saw it as a studio dumping a failed awards vehicle to be forgotten. However, the excuse that Sorkin wanted to release this movie before the US presidential elections seems to be true, because critics really enjoyed his old school courtroom drama, centered around the trial on counter cultural activists in the late ‘60s. Everybody praised uniformly the huge cast, that includes Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Jeremy Strong, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Frank Langella, William Hurt, Michael Keaton and Mark Rylance, which guarantees a SAG awards nomination (but makes it difficult to decide which actors will actually get nominated for Oscars). With a reaction that brings to mind the days of A Few Good Men and is the best reception he got since his Oscar winning script for The Social Network, the film faces a couple of hurdles. First of all, it got positioned as the frontrunner in the Best Picture race by some people, which instantly puts a target on its back. Then, we have to consider that the movie releases on Netflix this Friday, October 16, which makes it the first big contender this year to face the world, and which in these times of lockdown will probably make the reception to Marriage Story and The Irishman from last year look like a walk in the park. I mean, there are some people who aren’t swayed by Sorkin, and for good reason.
-The United States vs. Billie Holiday: While Paramount was quick to hand The Trial of the Chicago 7 to Netflix, there’s another movie that the studio kept to play in the upcoming awards season. This biographical drama follows the life of another famous musician, Billie Holiday (Andra Day), and we see the journey of her career in jazz as she is targeted by the Federal Department of Narcotics with an undercover sting operation led by Federal Agent Jimmy Fletcher (Trevante Rhodes), with whom she had a tumultuous affair. While the movie counts with a screenplay credit by Pulitzer winner Suzan-Lori Parks, the big question mark is the film’s director, Lee Daniels, who hit it big with Precious and then had results that were disastrous (The Paperboy) or financially successful, but not awards-wise (Lee Daniels’ The Butler). However, Paramount trusts in this movie, and with a release date on February 12, they want to make a splash.
-Wolfwalkers (trailer): While the attempts by Apple TV+ to establish themselves as a player in the TV world go from trainwrecks (See) to forgettable (The Morning Show) to eventually great (see Ted Lasso, everybody, this is not a joke), their plans to make a name in the film business have something to do with this year’s Oscars. While Cherry can come or go, they have a solid contender for the Best Feature Documentary with Boys State, but their big dog this year is the new movie by Cartoon Saloon, an Irish studio responsible for the acclaimed The Secret of Kells, The Song of the Sea, and The Breadwinner, all of which were nominated for Best Animated Feature. This time, Tomm Moore and Ross Stewart direct a story about a young apprentice hunter who journeys with her father to Ireland to help wipe out the last wolf pack. But everything changes when she befriends a free-spirited girl from a mysterious tribe rumored to transform into wolves by night. After getting critically acclaimed following its premiere at TIFF, this is a surefire contender for this year’s Best Animated Feature category, and Apple is gonna parade it before its streaming release on December 11. Also, while you watch that, you could watch a couple of episodes of Ted Lasso, too. It’s a really good show, it’s all I’m saying.
Anyways, that’s all the news from the last few months of festivals. No matter what happens next, this is gonna be a long, long, long race.
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2020.08.15 03:51 OldmanRevived I saw two movies (Project Power, Magic Camp)

First up was Project Power
"Project Power" does so little with its central gimmick that there's only wasted potential remaining. The core idea is the existence of a pill that gives a person a unique superpower for exactly five minutes. There's an explanation for this, and it's something to do with tapping into a human being's genetic potential. Since every life form on the planet is evolved from a more-than-ancient common ancestor, somewhere in human DNA are the hidden remnants of at least some other animal.
Everybody on board with the pill decides to buy or sell it, and they are filled with a bit of unexplained but powerful energy that creates radical molecular changes in their bodies. The results are that one person might become bulletproof and another might increase in mass, transforming into a hulking monster. The bulletproof thing is kind of plausible, but someone's going to have to explain which animal can spontaneously generate mass, defying multiple laws of biology and basic physics. But nevermind. The drug is a powerful currency in this world as it can make the impossible possible.
Robin (Dominique Fishback) is a teenage girl, struggling in school and forced to sell the pill on the streets to make money for her grandmother's medical bills. She is on the good side of Frank (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), a rebellious cop who is fed up with how many of his fellow officers are being injured or killed by people using the pill to commit crimes. Frank decides to try the pill himself in order to stop a bank robber, and that gets him in trouble with his captain (Courtney B. Vance). There's obligatory scene where the rogue cop has to turn everything in and call it quits, but to earn back his badge and gun, Frank has to hunt down the pill's main supplier.
We are then provided with the movie's anti-hero, Art (Jamie Foxx), a former soldier who was one of the military's early test subjects for the gene-altering substance. His daughter was kidnapped by unknown, sinister forces, and Art is tracking the supply chain of the pill into New Orleans, hoping to find the people who abducted her. Art is a tough guy, to be sure, but he's mostly just a megalomaniac who gets off on being able to beat up everyone in the room. Maybe one of the differences between a good action movie, and one that is merely technically competent, is that in the good ones, the characters have a motivation, and in the others, life is just a competitive sport.
As Frank works his way down the drug chain, he crosses paths with Art, who ends up essentially partnering with Robin while a villainous figure named Biggie (Rodrigo Santoro) lurks in the background, It's basically a long chase, as our heroes chase each other, each believing the other is somehow involved in the big conspiracy to bring the pill to the city, and then team up to chase the real bad guys. Various shootouts and showdowns occur, such as Art battling a local dealer who becomes engulfed in flames when he takes the pill, or a bloody gunfight, shot from within a foggy glass container.
The movie is by this point, alas, on autopilot. Gordon-Levitt's character, who has a grim fascination when he is enforcing the rules, turns into just another action hero when he starts breaking them. I actually thought, during the opening scenes, that "Project Power" was going to rise above the genre, and that it was going to be a study of violent psychology. No luck.
Too much action brings the movie to a dead standstill. It's all setup and demonstration, and naming and discussing and demonstrating, and it never digests the complications of the pill, or gets on to telling a compelling story. Art has the potential to be an intriguing man in the early scenes, and we think maybe we'll learn something about his harsh code and lonely profession. But no: We get countless scenes of him bashing and slamming enemies like the hero of a repetitive video game. The movie might have been great if it recognized that a human touch is a rare thing, and when you have it, there's no need to keep clenching it into a fist.

Next up was Magic Camp
Not a single rabbit is pulled from a hat in "Magic Camp." Most of the tricks that the kids perform are small scale: locking rings, disappearing scarves or card production. A deck of cards in their hands seems to have a life of its own. One thing we don't find out is how any of the tricks are done. I learn from IMDB that nearly all the magic tricks in the movie were practical, without any use of special effects. Houdini would be proud.
It's been a rough road to release for this movie. It was actually shot three years ago, stuck in limbo ever since, bopping around release dates and corporate plans before finally being sent to Disney+ to help lift up content requirements. Audiences will not really be losing anything this way; the movie is more of a Saturday afternoon stop for the kiddies - harmless, skillful and aimed at grade schoolers, specifically those who are interested in magic. The story involves six kids being packed off to one of those summer camps designed to do in a summer what parents have been undoing for a lifetime.
Theo (Nathaniel Logan McIntyre) loves magic, but has serious stage fright, possibly inspired by the death of his beloved dad (Aldis Hodge), who introduced him to the craft. Judd (Josie Totah) is afraid of living up to parental expectations, too, as his father is a famous magician. Ruth (Isabella Crovetti) wants to do animal magic, but is scared to touch bunnies. Vera (Izabella Alvarez) is kind of a weirdo, Nathan (Cole Sand) is a hypochondriac geek. Together, they make up the Hearts cabin at Magic Camp. Or, as the owner Roy Preston (Jeffrey Tambor) glamorously calls it, the Institute of Magic.
Meanwhile, former magic whiz Andy Duckerman (Adam DeVine) was once the institute’s biggest star: he won both the Top Hat and the Golden Wand, the camp’s biggest competitions. But personal upheavals crushed his dreams and he's spent the past few years driving a cab in Vegas. This is, of course, played as its own tragedy, but it's made worse by the fact that Andy's former partner Christina Darkwood (Gillian Jacobs) becomes a star on the strip.
Basically, Roy asks Andy to become a camp counselor at the institute. He agrees, but only because Christina will be there, too. Andy goes, cutting down on obvious drama and ensuring the film has plenty of time to really dig into what matters: a steady stream of montages that show Andy and the kids learning about a) magic, b) themselves, c) what really matters. The lessons of "Magic Camp" might be basic and wholly expected, but they’re still good ones. All the kids have the kinds of harmless problems that seem to exist only so that they can be harmless problems. Then of course there are some Big Problems which are rendered harmless, too. This is a very reassuring film.
The actors play their roles precisely, not broadly, and come across as people, not caricatures. DeVine is significantly less frenetic here than in his other roles, and Jacobs plays her part off as mostly quiet, calm, not trying too hard for laughs. The big payoff in the Top Hat Competition has all of the kids proving their skills. Trick secrets in some cases are pretty widely known. Most of the people in the audience know in theory exactly how it's done, but are connoisseurs in judging how well they are performed.
I am recommending the movie because it contains absolutely nothing to object to. That in itself may be objectionable, but you will have to decide for yourself. The film is upbeat, wholesome, chirpy, positive, sunny, cheerful, optimistic and squeaky-clean. It bears so little resemblance to the more complicated worlds of many members of its target audience (kids aged 4 to 11) that it may work as pure escapism.
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2020.06.29 08:19 MiracleAlien I need to get my thoughts out on a 6 month old relationship's end (and friendship potentially ending) (admission of unbro like behavior)

So I did one of these before on general demeanor but I kinda need to do another for general thoughts on my first relationship.
So it kinda all started junior year of highschool (20 right now by the way so 16 then). I had just failed my first ever class (this is relevant I swear). And at that point I kinda went off the deep end a bit. Up uh until then school was easy. I had built my persona off of being the smartest boy in the room (whether that was true was irrelevant). Point is that my identity had taken a bit of a hit and my confidence took a massive one.
Fast forward about half a year and my anxiety was kinda getting to me. I was getting depressed and the only thing getting me out of bed at the time was a friend of mine. For the sake of anonymity, we'll call her Becky. Becky and I had known each other since middle school but we'd only really known each other for about 2 years in 10th grade history (we had the same class). So at first I didnt really know how to talk to girls so I kinda made fun of her, I had the maturity of a slightly arrogant 4th grade at the time. Me and her would fire back and forth and despite my best efforts we became friends in 10th grade. In all honesty we became friends when I caught her at the time boyfriend in think tell her straight up not to be friends with me after a tutoring session because he hated me (that's a story that I dont really know the details too. Apparently I reminded him of a kid who bullied him and to be honest I was a nice guy creeper to a girl we were both friends with (THIS WILL BE IMPORTANT LATER (ALSO NOT BECKY))). I'd like to think I'm not anymore, that I did improve myself these last 4 years but that's really for other people to decide.
Back to 12th grade she started becoming one of my best friends. At a certain time she became the person I looked forward most to seeing and possibly the only reason I got out of bed in the morning. It wasn't romantic but I liked being around her and got actively sad when she wasn't there. Anyway we become best friends and we end up going to the same community college. Seeing as we didnt really know anyone there (apparently her friend group was flaky and backstab happy while mine just kinda evaporated), we stuck together (althougth I tried to make sure I saw her as much as possible. I made an active effort is what I'm saying.)
After about a year of being around each other in community college and our friendship rapidly progressing (she's the first person whose house I went over to), she worked up the courage to ask me out. I was a coward who couldn't tell girls my feelings (as evidenced by me being a nice guy creeper to that one girl), so this was kinda a relief for me. I never had a girlfriend before (see highschool), and the best previous romantic relationship I had was a girl I met at a food truck who I had my first kiss with (I was 18 at the time) who I never saw again.
I didn't really see her before hand as a potential romantic partner (Sort of, I was a dick but didn't want to be and I didnt want to ruin our friendship) but we decided to give it a shot (albeit I didnt really think we were dating for at least two weeks until she said she wanted to take boyfriend/girlfriend selfies).
At that point I kinda just did what any kid who lucked his way into a kind, caring person who somehow gave a shit about him, despite all evidence she had to not to, I did my best to prove I was worthy for lack of a better word. I tried to be the best boyfriend i could.
We went out, we did things and for a good while I was happy. I found an adventuring partner and she was right in front of me the whole time. A d against all odds I started to be a better person. I gave more of a shit about my appearance, I ate better, i exercised more, I studied more. Throught the power of "Holy Shit someone likes me and I like them and they dont hate me! Is this love!?!" I became a better person. I opened myself up to her in a way I never done with anyone before. She saw a vulnerable side of me and I let her know everything about me. My deep seated issues of loneliness, my years of being friendless up until middle school, my inadequacy issues, my at the time "confusion?", "questioning?" of my sexuality and gender (came out the same way by the end but it was nice to be able to tell someone not my parents about it). Basically she could read me like a book and semi vice versa. And even after being the most vulnerable i had ever been, she made me, a cripplingly insecure teenage boy man feel like he was bulletproof. Like I could fly. We even told each other we loved each other while I was at the gym of all places. It felt natural and right.
Now at that point (and looking back) I could kinda see the cracks. While we had a strong relationship, It wasn't without foible. She had some issues. Her family wasn't stable and her mom was sick. She needed a job to bring in income to help and was basically a mini parent for her little siblings. We had trouble really being intimate as we were always at her house and if we werent we were at school. Even past that we couldn't pull it off. So she gave me and out. And I didnt take it. She felt she had too much baggage. I, not realizing if a girl gives you an out, it means she wants out, said no, confident in whatever issues we had we could work them out.
At some point in October she told me about her depression, saying if I wanted to stay in, I'd have to deal with it and that no matter what I did I wouldnt be able to help her, she wouldn't be the most emotional available partner. She gave me and out again and I still didnt take it.
At that point our relationship was actually pretty good outs withstanding. We went to the beach where I swear she looked at my like I was the best thing since sliced bread and we did an escape room where she promised to get over her fear of handcuffs (she didnt). Until December 21st, 2019.
We went over to a friends house for a game of Smash and Cards against humanity and the subject of past relationships came up. Like I said I never really had one before hand past a fling in summer of 18, so I talked about that girl I was a nice guy too. How I regretted doing that to her, how she gave me a chance but i was too much of a dick or a coward to actually try. But at the end of the night she gave me my final out and I once again said no. She talked to me on how she didnt really feel anything. She was kinda numb. And she was worried she didnt feel anything between us. And she was worried that I was only going out with her because I didnt get with the other girl. I told her that what I felt toward the other girl was unhealthy (it was), that I was passed it and only reason I would ever want to meet her again was to say sorry about being a dick. Eventually the night came to an end.
That wasn't our first issue (second). The first was a dinner at Texas Road House where I was uncomfortable with her calling me her future husband (I saw a massive red flag). We talked about it and she said that her past boyfriends where clingy and where comforted by shit like that. I really wasn't. I was only 20 and we both agreed we didnt really want that. We started discussing how our relationship would hypothetically end (she said she would drive me away, I said I would mess up by cheating on her or something). Kids never tell a girl that you'd probably end the relationship by cheating on her somehow. You might mean it as a self deprivation joke but it never results in a net positive
But back to the point she steered clear of me for a few days until the 23rd where she told me we needed to talk but later. And on the 24th after an existential crisis about not having any friends and then getting my 3 friends back and feeling that I was going to pull Christams eve off, I called her. And she broke up with me. It's never good to have your heart broken kids. Its really not good to have it broken Christmas Eve. It was my fault, she wanted to wait until after Christmas to tell me and I forced the issue. She told me she loved me but she didnt love me like that. That the love wasn't instant, there wasn't that spark.
I reacted fairly well in my opinion. No cursing, no resentment, just kinda crying and talking and joking in the back of my moms car for an hour.
I saw her again the next day as I was going to give her her gift and had to go into work (got broken up with and had to work (worst Christmas I think I ever experienced ngl)). We talked a bit and tried to work some shit out. At that point I was still processing and we just kinda talked. And I went to work. One shift with cookies she made me in a Santa container, and cry singing Queen's "Death on two legs" is how I ended the night. It wasn't until Januray 4th I think that I saw her again.
We wanted to meet up earlier but she canceled and rescheduled. After seeing a movie we went to the parking lot. She caught me up on her life and how she was feeling better. Lived life a bit more fully. And I broke down. I tried to keep it in but at that point I just kinda broke. I didnt really have many friends and kinda became distant to the ones I did have, so she was all I had. I know it was unfair but I told her I was scared to be alone. How I was scared if it was something I did or if i messed up. She reassured me it wasn't and she was only really glad i didn't hate her. She comforted me and we eventually agreed we were going to be friends till the end, damn normal dating/break up conventions. And I was happy, because I really didnt want to be alone.
Fast forward a bit and she got me a job at her fast food place. I took the job because I wanted to spend more time with my friend, although in hindsight it might have been a massive mistake. She coached me a bit and our relationship eventually became big sistelittle brother. It took me until after Valentine's day to kinda accept it.
As the months went on I thought we developed a good rapport. It was until I told her I was leaving come Fall. I was in a program that would let me transfer to another school. I wanted us to kinda fuck around in the summer. Two friends against the world. A last hoorah. Needless to say the program blew up in my face and I never left. And then the Virus hit.
After taking 2 weeks of off time it was back to work. And if I wasn't a good employee before I wasn't one then. I got too close to costumers and treated them curtly, apparently. I didnt really give a shit about the job. Not really. I took it for the money and to spend time with Becky but that didnt really pan out and I think that led to some issues I hadn't considered. Becky needed her job and if I wasn't good there I reflected badly on her. So I tried. I tried my best. Not for my own sake or for caring about the job but for her. So she wouldnt be disappointed in me. Needless to say I know the issues with that now.
She eventually called me and tried to push me toward other employment. And I told her about the program blowing up in my face. She worried about me in the way that big sisters do. I think she was worried but I kinda just said I'd deal. It roll off my back. After all I was bullet proof. (Not just a metaphor for how she made me feel, I kinda turned it into a catchphrase).
Eventually I got my foot ran over by a customer. And left work for a week. She texted me or i texted her about something stupid and that was that. Eventually they let me go and I think that was for the best. I wasn't the best employee and it was a stressful time. They didnt need a laibility.
I tried texting her again(few times actually) but she didnt really respond. I dont think she's picking up again. I don't know if she doesn't want to talk to me any more or if things have just been too busy with Covid and trying to keep her family afloat. Either way it's been a while. And maybe its just paranoia and my perpetual fear of loneliness, but I think she's gone.
I dont know why I wrote this down. Maybe to chronical my first relationship, maybe pity points. As a reminder to be better, I dont know.
To sum up some thoughts, I miss her. I loved her and I miss our relationship, friendship or romantic. Looking back I missed a lot of red flags but I was so over joyed at someone liking me I couldn't see them.
I think maybe I should have stayed clear of her for a month at least but like I said, loneliness and abandonment and not having a wide support circle is a bitch.
Honestly end of the day, I'm just worried I let her down. She believed in me, trusted me and I let her down.
(Tell me if theres any problematic behavior here, I dont know. Bad framing or just a refusal to let go).
Any way, see ya and to the Future guess.
Edit: To expand a bit I'm worried that I might have over relied on her for emotional support. I mean I know I did but you know. I'm also worried I did the Joseph Gordon Levitt in 500 days of Summer thing of idealizing them in your head. I dont know shits weird.
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2020.06.20 08:47 OldmanRevived I saw two movies (You Should Have Left, 7500)

First up was You Should Have Left
"You Should Have Left" opens with one of those irrelevant shock buttons that has become annoying in recent years: the "it was only a dream" false alarm. Afterwards, it shifts through the entire control panel, driving a plot that consists of characters wandering along through dark bedrooms, basements and corridors, wondering if the noises they hear are just their imaginations while out-of-focus shapes and faces dart through the negative space nearby. Scary things do happen in the movie, but they're always telegraphed in advance and make too little sense to have a cumulative effect. It all begins with another one of those secluded houses that an innocent family rents as a vacation spot. Real estate mortgage rates have at least gotten a little lower now; you don't have to take the first house that you look at just because the bank seems suspiciously eager to unload it at a real good price.
Working from a novella by Daniel Kehlmann, the movie stars Kevin Bacon as Theo Conroy, a wealthy banker married to Susanna (Amanda Seyfried), a starlet who's about to leave for a long shoot in London. Theo's scribbling isn’t professional, however, but simply therapeutic: It seems that his first wife passed away under questionable circumstances, and even though he was given a not-guilty verdict, he couldn't convince the general public of his innocence. It’s the cause of a lot of sublimated rage; so, for that matter, is his jealousy regarding his much younger second wife. Not even his mandated anger-management journaling can quell the paranoia and tension. So before Susanna reports to set, her and Theo along with their daughter, Ella (Avery Tiiu Essex), decide to take a quick family vacation, and head off to a modern countryside estate in the lush, secluded hills of Wales.
Susanna never quite understands the nature of Theo's mental horror. He is insanely jealous, for one thing. And when he goes to a film set and watches her film an explicit sex scene, those green-eyed tendencies tend to flair. For Susanna’s part, well, let’s just say she’s young, gorgeous, appreciates the fawning attention of other men, and keeps certain secrets. Theo can't keep himself from checking Susanna's every call and message. As that mistrust deepens, so does the terror, both of his nightmares and within the house. The place is full of labyrinthine hallways, hidden rooms, and doors that appear and disappear. It seems to be bigger on the inside than it is on the outside. Even the locals know there's something wrong with the place, and they seem very wary of its mysterious owner, a man named Stetler. I think the identity of the actor playing Stetler is supposed to be a surprise, but it's another thing that's probably more obvious than it should be.
The character who suffers the most is poor little Ella. Something is always bothering her in the middle of the night. As Theo begins to have deeper illusions, and his dreams feature him clamoring to save his daughter from peril, Ella screams and screams. If you were Ella's parents and your house was haunted, wouldn't you move the poor kid into the bedroom with you? They're too slow to catch on, even as Theo looks in his notebook and finds the words "You should leave now" scribbled in big, bold letters. Evil spirits are up to their old tricks, and they require too much forgiveness on the part of the audience. If you find yourself thinking, as I did during the movie, "Why don't they just leave the damn house?" then you're dead in the water. And so is the film.
"You Should Have Left" was written and directed by David Koepp, and it is to his credit that he lets the dynamic between Theo and Susanna be the film's anchor. Kevin Bacon is sometimes able to suggest characters who are being driven mad by themselves. Here he implodes in a role where that's the right choice; another actor might have reached too far. Amanda Seyfried is not merely worried, but also exasperated by her husband, which is the right realistic touch. The plot is a dime a dozen, and since it is so utterly predictable, we hope at least for some cleverness in the gimmicks. But in the end, everything turns out to be so disappointing that I wonder if Koepp was really trying. Did anyone connected with the production notice that they were making a movie that, in essence, had already been made?

Next up was 7500
Ever since the events of September 11, 2001, airlines have exercised incredible vigilance to prevent similar tragedies. But the fact that "7500" shows the assailants going through security checks and purchasing the items needed for makeshift shivs all without raising suspicion makes it even feel pretty unnerving, due in large part to the ease with which they nearly pull off their plot. There is no attempt to portray the passengers or terrorists as people with histories. In most movies about doomed voyages, we meet a few key characters we'll be following. Here there's none of that. What we know about the passengers on the flight is exactly what we would know if we had been on the plane and sitting across from them: nothing, except for a few details of personal appearance.
The one person we do meet is Tobias Ellis (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), an American pilot in Germany preparing for a flight to Paris. He’s partnered with Captain Lutzmann (Carlo Kitzlinger), a seasoned professional settling into what’s traditionally a ride of limited complications, giving Tobias responsibilities to help with his professional future. Tobias is in a relationship with flight attendant Gokce (Aylin Tezel), who’s worried about their young son’s educational opportunities, but time soon comes to prepare for passengers, with the co-pilot getting the plane into the air.
Everything seems fine and the airplane takes off smoothly. However, after a few minutes in the air, terrorists barge into the cockpit and wound both Lutzmann and Tobias, with Kenan (Murathan Muslu) managing to slice open Tobias’s arm, and stab Lutzmann repeatedly before getting knocked unconscious. Tobias tries to maintain composure as he monitors chaos erupting on the plane, making contact with Vedat (Omid Memar) though a cabin phone, trying to talk the nervous monster out of the hijack plan while his partner, Daniel (Paul Wollin), is unstable, killing passengers and stating that he will continue until the cockpit door is unlocked.
The film takes place entirely inside the cockpit, with the surveillance camera constituting the only interface that we, and Tobias, have with what’s going on in the main body of the aircraft. Tobias' only contact with a world beyond the cockpit is a phone to just outside the door, where the hijackers offer no intention of negotiating or compromising, and the radio to an air traffic controller, who can only offer a runway to make an emergency landing and condolences when the hijackers follow through on their threats.
"7500" (which, by the way, is the pilot’s code for a hijacking) is incomparably more powerful because it depicts all of its characters as people trapped in an inexorable progress toward tragedy. The movie contains no politics. No theory. No personal chit-chat. No patriotic speeches. We never see the big picture. In addition to limiting the backdrop to the cockpit, director Patrick Vollrath more or less allows the story to unfold in real time, which gets us into a certain relaxed rhythm before, during, and shortly after takeoff. We know something is amiss when, through a monitor showing the view from just above the cockpit door, a foot appears to be holding back a dividing curtain.
We're trapped with Tobias, not only in the confined space, but also in the emotional turmoil of knowing there is nothing that can be done. In that regard, the film's most notable virtue is Gordon-Levitt's performance, which finds its bearings, not in reacting to the terror and horror of what the character witnesses, but in his resolve to maintain a steady head as the inevitable happens again and again. That internalized sense of forced calm and attempting to remain psychologically distant in the face of all this becomes story's dramatic force.
Is the film uncomfortable as a result of its setup? It most certainly is. Can we simply dismiss the film or its obvious virtues as a piece of filmmaking because we're uncomfortable with both the story and its goals? Bear in mind, I cannot answer that question for anyone but myself. From that individual perspective, Vollrath's thrills are more of the cerebral, moral, and ethical varieties, so the film never feels deliberately exploitative. Indeed, the fact that the narrative involves so many difficult questions about the horrific realities of this scenario means that he probably understood the potential issues with this premise in the first place.
Vollrath does not exploit, he draws no conclusions, he points no fingers, he avoids human interest and personal dramas and just simply watches. It's easy to dislike "7500" because of it's reclusiveness, and it's prosperously selfish draw from modern convention. But gee, I dunno, I found the movie to be quite thrilling as it went along. To watch it is to be confronted with the grim chaotic reality of a hostage situation. All classic and airtight, and handled with economy and a sturdy clarity of action. The movie's strength, then, is not in its outrage, but in its cynicism and resignation.
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2020.05.24 23:09 finnagains Unexpected Movie Masterpieces to Watch in Quarantine - by David Sims (The Atlantic) 10 April 2020

Some were blasted by critics, some flopped at the box office, and all are ripe to attain cult-classic status.
With new cinema releases grinding to a halt in response to the spread of the coronavirus, I’ve used these weeks of self-quarantine to cast an eye backward over the cinematic canon, to rewatch old favorites, and to fill in viewing gaps. Now I’ve begun evaluating films that, for whatever reason, didn’t get a fair shake when they were released. Some were blasted by critics, and others simply made no impression at the box office; all of them are available to watch online, just waiting to become cult classics. The 30 films I’ve chosen as the most underrated are all from the past 25 years, and many belong to genres (rom-com, sci-fi, thriller) that are overlooked in serious critical circles. Some of my selections might seem obvious and others ludicrous, but all were made in the spirit of enjoyable debate and discovery.
the Box-Office Flops
Kino Lorber Archipelago (2010, directed by Joanna Hogg)
Joanna Hogg broke out in American art houses last year with her wonderful autobiographical work The Souvenir, but she’s been making terrific indie films for years. Archipelago might be her best. A quiet drama, it sees Edward (played by Tom Hiddleston, a year before Thor catapulted him to fame) gathering with his family on the remote British island of Tresco after quitting his job to travel the world. Many long-simmering tensions boil to the surface; Hiddleston (who is in most of Hogg’s movies) gives one of his best screen performances, and Hogg depicts subtle, polite infighting with humor and insight. No filmmaker has a better handle on the ridiculous foibles of the English upper-middle class.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Babe: Pig in the City (1998, directed by George Miller)
George Miller is the master of sequels. Each of his installments in the Mad Max series is innovative; his Happy Feet Two is quietly underrated. But he’s never made a follow-up as strange and beguiling as Babe: Pig in the City. Miller wrote and produced the first Babe, a charming, Oscar-winning success. In the director’s chair for part two, though, he turned the sweet fable of a pig who wanted to herd sheep into a grim fairy tale about life in the big city. The movie was a commercial disaster, but it’s a rewarding, beautifully designed work set in a fantasy city that mashes up landmarks from every modern metropolis. The plot, such as it is, follows Babe as he goes on a trip and mixes it up with more streetwise animal brethren (the director Noah Baumbach once said that the film’s closest thematic companion is Stanley Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut).
Watch it on: Hulu, HBO Beyond the Lights (2014, directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood)
A gorgeous romantic drama about the pain and pleasure of pop stardom, Gina Prince-Bythewood’s remarkable Beyond the Lights made little impression at the box office on release, despite a star-making turn from Gugu Mbatha-Raw. The actor plays a Rihanna-esque figure named Noni Jean who falls for a police officer (Nate Parker) and tries to escape the limelight. Prince-Bythewood, who also wrote and directed the incredible Love & Basketball, is one of only a few people in Hollywood still trying to film genuine love stories, and she deserves many more chances to do so on the big screen.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Cadillac Records (2008, directed by Darnell Martin)
The smartest music biopic from a decade full of them (including 2004’s Ray and 2005’s Walk the Line, to name a couple), Darnell Martin’s portrayal of the rise and fall of Chess Records was woefully underseen in 2008. The film digs into the exploitative dynamics at work in so many early rock-and-roll labels, examining the troubled relationships between Leonard Chess (Adrien Brody) and his biggest stars: Muddy Waters (Jeffrey Wright), Etta James (Beyoncé Knowles), and Howlin’ Wolf (Eamonn Walker). The film has a harder edge than its contemporaries, and the musical performances are particularly sensational.
Watch it on: Crackle
Cloud Atlas (2012, directed by Lana Wachowski, Lilly Wachowski, and Tom Tykwer)
This is the most dizzyingly ambitious project in the Wachowski sisters’ expansive filmography. Adapting David Mitchell’s novel of the same name, Cloud Atlas encompasses six distinct stories, beginning with an 1849 naval adventure and zipping through the 1930s, the ’70s, and the present day before blasting to the clone-filled future of 2144 and ending in a postapocalyptic 2321. Members of the ensemble, including Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Hugh Grant, and Doona Bae, play different characters in each story line, and the film jumps backward and forward through time to reveal surprising thematic links. As with many a Wachowski project, you have to make a few logical leaps to get on board, but if you can, there’s no movie experience like it.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime
20th Century Fox Film Corp. Down With Love (2003, directed by Peyton Reed)
This knowing throwback to the “no-sex sex comedies” of the late ’50s and ’60s (like the Doris Day–starring Pillow Talk and Lover Come Back) was too clever for its own good on release. But it’s a fabulous, entertaining, and singular creation, both celebrating and subverting the innuendo-filled rom-coms of yesteryear. An impeccably styled Renée Zellweger and Ewan McGregor star as lifestyle writers who form a friendly rivalry in 1960s New York. Sarah Paulson and David Hyde Pierce round out the cast, and Peyton Reed (who had just directed Bring It On in 2000) plays off the visual language of his source material in stylish, innovative, and cheeky ways. When you watch, be sure to stick around for the fantastic musical number over the closing credits.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Dredd (2012, directed by Pete Travis)
Perhaps the best comic-book movie of the past decade was Dredd, a gritty adaptation of the Judge Dredd series that was a financial flop on release. Set in a dictatorial future in which armored policemen are empowered to dispense lethal justice for almost any crime, the film takes place entirely within a colossal tower block, following Dredd (Karl Urban) and a new trainee as they do battle with a sadistic mob boss (Lena Headey). It’s a gruesome but smart movie, at once lionizing and satirizing the ruthless efficiency of its hero. The film was written and produced by Alex Garland (Ex Machina, Annihilation), who has since become one of the most exciting sci-fi directors working today.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Killing Them Softly (2012, directed by Andrew Dominik)
Killing Them Softly is Andrew Dominik’s brutal follow-up to his painterly revisionist Western, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Also starring Brad Pitt, Killing Them Softly takes George V. Higgins’s hard-boiled ’70s crime novel Cogan’s Trade and updates it to the present day, following a mob robbery that goes wrong and the assassin (Pitt) hired to clean everything up. Dominik turns the web of competing criminal interests into a broad metaphor for the quagmire of the Iraq War. Killing Them Softly may have been too weird and slow for general audiences (it’s one of the few movies ever to earn an F on CinemaScore). But it’s bleakly funny and impressively acted by a cast that includes James Gandolfini, Ray Liotta, and Ben Mendelsohn.
Watch it on: Netflix Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005, directed by Shane Black)
The film that put Robert Downey Jr. back on the map was critically praised but ignored at the box office in 2005. An extremely metatextual crime comedy, it follows a thief (Downey Jr.) pretending to be an actor who gets mixed up in a murder and goes on the lam with his acting coach, a private investigator (Val Kilmer). The story line is as complicated as it sounds, but the thrill of Shane Black’s film lies in his hilariously punchy dialogue and his skill at making the most convoluted plotting flow with ease. The movie reintroduced Downey Jr. as a leading man after he’d spent years struggling with addiction: He was hired to play Iron Man mostly on the strength of this performance.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Premium Rush (2012, directed by David Koepp)
David Koepp’s bike-messenger thriller is far more robust than that description might suggest. Set on New York’s crowded streets, it follows Wilee (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), a deliveryman who picks up a package that’s tied to a criminal conspiracy; soon enough, he’s being chased around town by a crooked cop, Bobby Monday (Michael Shannon), who’s intent on taking him down. The story is told with unrelenting silliness, and Koepp translates Wilee’s brash confidence about weaving in and out of traffic into a visual roller-coaster ride. The highlight, though, is Shannon’s performance—he turns Monday into a living Looney Toon, gnashing his teeth and bulging out his eyes in fury with abandon.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Solaris (2002, directed by Steven Soderbergh)
Steven Soderbergh’s sci-fi opus was decried on release for daring to re-adapt a novel (by Stanisław Lem) that had already been turned into a film masterpiece (Andrei Tarkovsky’s sprawling 1972 work of the same name). But Soderbergh’s movie is a very different beast from Tarkovsky’s, stripping the story down to 99 minutes and focusing on the haunting romance at the center of the book. George Clooney plays Chris Kelvin, a psychologist haunted by the suicide of his wife, Rheya (Natascha McElhone). After hearing the mysterious distress signals sent out by a distant space station, he travels there—and finds Rheya, somehow re-created by the planet that the station is orbiting. The film includes stellar supporting performances by Viola Davis and Jeremy Davies, a beautifully understated score from Cliff Martinez, and some of the most compelling world-building in Soderbergh’s career.
Watch it on: Hulu
Sunshine (2007, directed by Danny Boyle)
This stunning space-mission drama from Danny Boyle and the screenwriter Alex Garland might be the Oscar-winning director’s best film. A wildly intense thriller about a last-gasp effort to restart the dying sun, Sunshine pits an outstanding cast (Cillian Murphy, Michelle Yeoh, Chris Evans, Rose Byrne, and more) against a monolithic enemy: the star at the center of our solar system, which Boyle depicts as an immovable, godlike force. As the voyagers’ ship gets closer to the sun, everything on board goes more and more haywire, and Boyle—who can depict the onset of madness better than almost anyone working—dials up the chaos.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Talk to Me (2007, directed By Kasi Lemmons)
Kasi Lemmons, whose most recent work is 2019’s Harriet, has long been one of Hollywood’s most criminally unheralded directors, and Talk to Me never got the wide audience it deserved in 2007. It’s a biopic of the controversial Washington, D.C., radio host Petey Greene (Don Cheadle) that’s unafraid to be messy, reflecting its subject’s surprising rise to fame as someone who fearlessly speaks his mind on the social and political issues of the 1970s. The film is grounded by excellent performances from Cheadle, Taraji P. Henson, and Chiwetel Ejiofor, who plays Greene’s put-upon manager, Dewey Hughes.
Watch it on: Hulu, Sling What If (2013, directed by Michael Dowse)
Also known as The F Word (its title was changed in America for obvious reasons), this extremely charming slow-burn rom-com was unfairly overlooked on release. It follows two people (Daniel Radcliffe and Zoe Kazan) who become friends but spend the entire time wondering if they’d be better off as lovers. Many relationship hijinks ensue, but the movie works because of the performances at its center, along with energetic supporting turns from Adam Driver and Mackenzie Davis, who were both on their way to bigger, franchise fame.
Watch it on: Prime The Yards (2000, directed by James Gray)
Back in 2000, James Gray’s operatic crime thriller was dumped unceremoniously into theaters by Harvey Weinstein and ignored by audiences. Like all the director’s films, though, it’s well worth viewing, combining hard-boiled storytelling with graceful visuals. Mark Wahlberg gives one of his best performances as Leo, an ex-con who returns to the fold of his shady New York family and gets tangled up in city corruption surrounding the subway system. A shifty Joaquin Phoenix plays Leo’s ne’er-do-well friend who is embroiled in a dramatic relationship with a young woman (Charlize Theron), while James Caan is suitably menacing as Leo’s morally dubious benefactor. The Yards also showed the first signs of Gray’s considerable talent; he’d go on to make We Own the Night, Two Lovers, The Lost City of Z, and Ad Astra.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime the critical bombs
Warner Bros. Addicted to Love (1997, directed by Griffin DUnne)
All of Griffin Dunne’s films (including the delightfully bizarre Practical Magic) deserve more appreciation, but Addicted to Love is a personal favorite of mine, a largely forgotten romantic comedy that satirizes gooey Hollywood storytelling tropes. It casts Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick, two stalwarts of the rom-com genre, as a bitter pair united by a hatred of their respective exes, who are now dating each other. Ryan and Broderick spy on their former partners and, of course, eventually fall for each other, but the film never sacrifices its acidic tone, even as their relationship turns tender.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Armageddon (1998, directed by Michael Bay)
If nothing else, Armageddon is a crucial cultural artifact: a portent of American culture’s jingoism in the 2000s, when blockbuster action sequences had the tone and tenor of Budweiser commercials. Where Michael Bay’s prior film, The Rock (which is much better regarded), had tapped into the U.S. military’s dysfunction and despondency post-Vietnam, Armageddon sees the country uniting to obliterate an evil asteroid by turning to … the oil industry. (It also spends a good chunk of time mocking post-Soviet Russia.) Despite the ridiculous plotting and Bay’s frenetic editing of every set piece, Armageddon is the clearest distillation of his macho brand of propaganda, designed to have audiences cheering by the end (against their better judgment). Listen to Ben Affleck’s gleeful commentary to triple the entertainment factor.
Watch it on: Hulu, HBO Blackhat (2015, directed by Michael Mann)
Five years ago, one of the great contemporary directors still working made a globe-trotting cyber thriller starring Thor himself and was completely ignored. Booed by critics and dumped by its studio into the doldrums of January, Blackhat made only a shocking $8 million at the domestic box office. Yet it’s a terrific entry in Michael Mann’s esteemed body of work (which includes other movies, such as Heat, Miami Vice, and Manhunter, that were underrated in their day). Chris Hemsworth plays a hard-bodied hacker who’s released from prison to battle a shadowy online terrorist; like many of Mann’s later films, Blackhat is a story of the analog world’s struggle to confront its digital future, wrapped up in a very masculine action saga. If you can, try to catch the director’s cut, which cleans up some of the film’s dense plotting and airs regularly on FX.
Watch it on: FX The Box (2009, directed by Richard Kelly)
This is the third film directed by Richard Kelly, a onetime wunderkind who burst onto the scene with the 2001 cult hit Donnie Darko. The Box is also his best, though few have recognized it as such. It was a bomb on release, getting poor reviews and the rare dishonor of an F from CinemaScore. But its wild ambition is second to none, spinning Richard Matheson’s mordant short story “Button, Button” into a paranoid 1970s epic—part domestic drama, part psychological horror, part sci-fi fantasy revolving around a NASA expedition to Mars and magic portals. This movie has short, simple scares that I’ve never forgotten, and a plot convoluted enough to obsess over forever. I live in hope of a fourth film from Kelly.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Constantine (2005, directed by Francis Lawrence)
Fifteen years after its release, this remains one of the best and cleverest comic-book adaptations ever made, and probably the most underrated entry in Keanu Reeves’s cinematic career. This is a horror thriller that dives into biblical fantasy, casting a varied ensemble (Tilda Swinton, Djimon Hounsou, Gavin Rossdale, and Shia LaBeouf) as various angels and demons doing battle in modern-day Los Angeles. Based on Alan Moore’s Vertigo comic Hellblazer, Constantine junks a lot of the established hallmarks of the character John Constantine (he’s supposed to be a witty Brit who looks like Sting), but that doesn’t matter. Reeves’s laconic style is a perfect fit for the cynical antihero, and Rachel Weisz thrives in twin roles as sisters on either side of an infernal crime that Constantine is called to investigate.
Watch it on: DC Universe The Counselor (2013, directed by Ridley Scott)
Of the seven films made by Ridley Scott in the past decade, none is more critically reviled than The Counselor, a knotty crime drama written by Cormac McCarthy and featuring an all-star ensemble that includes Brad Pitt, Javier Bardem, Michael Fassbender, Penélope Cruz, and Cameron Diaz. Summarizing its noir-ish plot, which revolves around the Juárez, Mexico, drug trade, is impossible, but the film is worth watching simply because there’s nothing like it. McCarthy’s florid dialogue and Scott’s hazy visuals are bewitching, and every actor gives an energetic performance pushed to ridiculous heights (one scene in particular, involving Diaz and a Ferrari, is hypnotically baffling). The Counselor is a dark acquired taste, but a deeply satisfying one.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Universal pictures The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006, directed by Justin Lin)
After the success of the first Fast and the Furious movie, in 2001, Vin Diesel’s car-racing franchise struggled to stand out until 2009, when its original cast returned under Justin Lin’s direction for the surprise smash Fast & Furious. But the groundwork for that revitalization had been laid three years earlier with Tokyo Drift, Lin’s debut film in the series. Though Tokyo Drift introduces Sung Kang as the fan-favorite character Han, none of the series’s other beloved characters appears. Yet Lin’s skill with crisp action and quick-paced banter—built up in his fantastic breakthrough, Better Luck Tomorrow, which also starred Kang—makes this one of the best in the franchise.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Hulk (2003, directed by Ang Lee)
Coming off the resounding success of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Ang Lee could’ve made any film he wanted. He picked an adaptation of Marvel Comics’ most tortured star, the Hulk (Eric Bana). At the time, the movie was seen as odd, mocked for its wobbly CGI, and suffered one of the largest box-office drops in history for a blockbuster after its opening weekend. Viewed now, given the cookie-cutter format of contemporary superhero movies, it’s a startling experience. Lee turns his film into a living comic book, zooming in and out of boxy frames and inventing a visual language that could’ve become an exciting norm for the medium. The story, which sees the Hulk doing Freudian battle with his demonic father (Nick Nolte) and unearthing dark family secrets, is bizarre, and thrillingly so.
Watch it on: Starz In the Cut (2003, directed by Jane Campion)
Every film Jane Campion has directed since her Oscar-winning The Piano (1993) is underrated and underseen, but In the Cut was perhaps her biggest flop on release. That was partly because it subverted Meg Ryan’s usual bubbly onscreen persona, casting her as Frannie Avery, an introverted English teacher who starts dating the detective (Mark Ruffalo) investigating a murder case in her apartment building. It’s a sweaty, grisly, and sexually charged thriller that swerves from strange comedy to gory horror from scene to scene. But that tonal whiplash is one of Campion’s smartest storytelling tools, properly rattling viewers and plunging them into Frannie’s mixed-up headspace.
Watch it on: Crackle Jennifer’s Body (2009, directed by Karyn Kusama)
This is the movie that landed Karyn Kusama in “movie jail” for almost a decade: a gleefully bloody teen-horror comedy that was undone by the high expectations for its script. The writer, Diablo Cody, had won an Oscar the previous year for her Juno screenplay, and though this follow-up had that film’s humor, its intense gore and flippant humor were too much for critics at the time. Fortunately, Jennifer’s Body is already being reevaluated as a trashy classic, a nastier update of movies like Heathers that turns the social competition of high school into a literal bloodbath. Kusama has also reemerged as a filmmaker, with the excellent indie horror The Invitation.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Universal pictures Josie and the Pussycats (2001, directed by Harry Elfont and Deborah Kaplan)
This knowing revival of the Archie Comics series was a failure on release, but has deservedly attracted a cult following in the years since. It’s a pitch-perfect parody of the manufactured pop pipeline in the early 2000s, watching as the chipper rock band comprising Josie (Rachael Leigh Cook), Melody (Tara Reid), and Valerie (Rosario Dawson) is run through the major-label mill. Parker Posey and Alan Cumming play perfect corporate villains, and almost every scene is suffused with ostentatious subliminal advertising, with au courant brand names crowding the frame. It’s a bitingly clever work, with a great power-pop soundtrack that includes contributions from the late Adam Schlesinger.
Watch it on: Hulu with Cinemax, Xfinity Jupiter Ascending (2015, directed by Lana Wachowski and Lilly Wachowski)
In the 2010s, blockbuster studio filmmaking made a hard pivot to existing intellectual property for its biggest movies: Star Wars, comic books, anything audiences might have nostalgia for. The Wachowskis, as they often do, went their own route. After giving cinema one of its greatest franchises in 1999 with The Matrix, the duo took a different direction in 2015 with a loopily operatic sci-fi epic rooted in nothing but their own imaginations. They were pilloried by critics. Jupiter Ascending is a wonderfully absurd space fairy tale starring Channing Tatum as a dog-man, Eddie Redmayne as an immortal arch-capitalist villain, and Mila Kunis as a secret princess who unwittingly owns the property deeds to our solar system. If you can get on this movie’s wavelength, you’ll find much to enjoy in its many flights of fancy.
Watch it on: Netflix
Non-Stop (2014, directed by Jaume Collet-Serra)
Since the surprise success of Taken in 2008, Liam Neeson has played a broken-down man forced to take the law into his own hands in countless mid-budget action dramas: Unknown, Cold Pursuit, The Commuter, Run All Night, and many more. Non-Stop is easily the best of them, partly thanks to Jaume Collet-Serra, a Spanish director who is one of the finest purveyors of modern pulp cinema (along with many Neeson movies, his other credits include The Shallows and Orphan). Set entirely on an airplane flying from New York to London, Non-Stop follows an alcoholic air marshal who gets caught in a deadly battle when a terrorist starts texting him. Perfectly befitting its setting, this thriller has the plot of the best kind of airplane paperback, with just the right number of twists and turns.
Watch it on: Sling Ocean’s Twelve (2004, directed by Steven Soderbergh)
Despite coasting to box-office success, Ocean’s Twelve was disliked on release for swerving in the opposite direction from the über-cool Ocean’s Eleven. Critics dismissed it as overindulgent, pretentious, and ultimately pointless: The heist plot is nigh-impossible to understand, most of the crucial exposition is entirely absent, and there’s a subplot in which the character played by Julia Roberts pretends to be the real Julia Roberts. In hindsight, though, the film is a perfect deconstruction of sequel logic, showing the difficulty of finding new directions for a beloved cast of characters. Where Ocean’s Eleven was all smooth style, Ocean’s Twelve is a knowing subversion that lays bare the ridiculous fallacy of movie-star charm. It also happens to be very, very funny.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Pain & Gain (2013, directed by Michael Bay)
Practically every Bay film has been dismissed by reviewers on release, and often for good reason. His high-octane storytelling style makes the simplest scenes of dialogue utterly hyperactive, and most of his recent efforts are about talking robot toys. But Pain & Gain was a sly departure for this director, a low-budget (by his standards) crime comedy that feels like a Coen Brothers movie on growth hormones. Based on a true story, Pain & Gain is about three bodybuilders (played by Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson, and Anthony Mackie) who embark on a harebrained kidnapping scheme for easy money; naturally, things quickly go awry. Bay doesn’t abandon his trademark energy, but instead deploys it as satire—these characters might think they’re in a flashy action movie, but their circumstances are far more mundane and depressing.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime
https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2020/04/30-underrated-films-watch-quarantine/609784/
submitted by finnagains to Moviereviewed [link] [comments]


2018.09.23 14:36 Anonymous_1-2-3-4-5 MCU Movies Behind the Scenes Facts *Wanted to do this for fun* Day 12: Ant-Man

So i'm going to go on IMDB and look at each MCU movies behind the scenes facts and POST THE MOST INTERESTING ONES here, I will post each movie a day instead of what I did before where I did 10 posts, I will start with the first Iron Man and each day will be the next MCU movie after it, ending with Guardians 3, I will also do the Netflix Shows, Agents of Shield and Agent Carter

ANT-MAN

1. At first, the film was meant to focus on the original Ant-Man, Hank Pym. However, Pym developed several personalities, one of whom abused his girlfriend, and producers decided he was not family friendly. Instead, the focus shifted to Scott Lang, with Pym as a mentor and supporting character.

2. When Paul Rudd told his nine-year-old son he was going to be Ant-Man, his son said, "Wow, I can't wait to see how stupid that'll be."

3. The Falcon's role in the plot came about after Adam McKay and Paul Rudd went to see Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014) and fell in love with the character. They casually suggested working him into the plot, and Kevin Feige informed them that it would actually make perfect sense since Falcon was now living at the New Avengers compound as of Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015).

4. For the 1980s flashback scenes, de-aging VFX were used on the 70-year-old Michael Douglas and the 57-year-old Martin Donovan to make them appear younger, and aging VFX were combined with the wig and make-up 33-year old Hayley Atwell wore to make her appear older.

5. Michael Douglas celebrated his 70th birthday on set. As an homage to his on-screen character and to celebrate the milestone, the crew presented him with a birthday cake decorated in icing with ants crawling over a film reel.

6. Michael Douglas joked about his being made younger through CGI, saying he felt like doing a prequel to one of his younger films: "Seeing myself CGI-ed at the beginning of the movie thirty years younger was incredible! I had these little dots all over my face, and I'm looking at it and half way through the scene the picture it just appeared and there I was thirty years ago. Romancing the Stone (1984). I'm thinking I'm all for a prequel!"

7. According to Michael Douglas, the costume for Paul Rudd had to be altered because of his muscles. Rudd had gone on an extensive training and workout regimen in order to build the proper muscle size for a superhero, but Rudd had become so muscular, they had to soften his costume up.

8. While Edgar Wright was working on the film, he requested that Marvel refrain from using Ant-Man or Wasp until he had finished the movie, which is why they were absent from The Avengers (2012).

9. In addition to getting in shape with the help of a trainer and weights, Paul Rudd worked with a gymnast. Rudd said of using a gymnast, "I knew I was going to have to do rolls and flips and things like that. I just wanted to be as convincing as possible."

10. Posters for "Pingo Doce," the Brazilian soda company Bruce Banner worked for in The Incredible Hulk (2008), can be seen in the San Francisco scenes.

11. The laser sounds fired from Yellowjacket's suit are the same sound as the main gun on an AT-AT being fired in the Star Wars movies.

12. Michael Douglas explained why he took the role of Hank Pym, saying, "And most importantly, I did it for my children. They're so excited. I've finally got a picture that they are so excited about. Dad is cool. You have to understand, for most of my career, I've done so many R-rated pictures. They can never see any of my movies." *At the time of release of this film his children were 14 and 12\*

13. (at around 46 mins) Scott Lang suggests calling the Avengers to assist. In the comics, Ant-Man was an original Avenger.

14. Scott's brief work at Baskin-Robbins was originally going to be at Chipotle, but the company did not like their negative portrayal. The filmmakers considered Jamba Juice, then settled on Baskin-Robbins after realizing that the bright colors would be a funny contrast to the dark prison opening.

15. Director Edgar Wright, a big fan of Ant-Man, proposed the film to Marvel in 2003, describing it as "an action-adventure comedy; a cross-genre action and special effects bonanza." He had been developing the movie since then, shooting a test reel and hiring the cast, and was close to begin shooting the movie. However, in 2014, he dropped out due to "creative differences" with Disney, which had bought out Marvel Studios five years prior.

16. (at around 11 mins) Darren Cross jokes that the concept of a shrinking human sounds like a "tale to astonish." Ant-Man made his debut in the comic "Tales to Astonish" #27 (Jan. 1962). Darren Cross shrinks a chair as part of a demonstration; this was taken from the same comic, where the first thing Hank Pym shrank was a chair.

17. (at around 32 mins) Garrett Morris, who portrays a cab driver in the film, appeared as Ant-Man in the Saturday Night Live: Margot KiddeThe Chieftains (1979) sketch, which was the first live-action appearance of the hero.

18. Paul Rudd and stuntmen wore actual Ant-Man suits while Corey Stoll wore a motion-capture suit as Yellowjacket. This decision was made early on when creating and filming with a real Yellowjacket costume was found to be impractical.

19. At the beginning of the film, set in 1989, the Triskelion is being constructed. The building was S.H.I.E.L.D's main quarters in Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014).

20. The shrunken-down scenes feature a great deal of dust mites, which was a deliberate move by the VFX artists to emphasize an insect's point of view (they see the world in greater detail than a human does).

21. Whilst filming a scene with Michael Douglas, Paul Rudd attempted to reenact the famous interrogation scene with Sharon Stone from Basic Instinct (1992). Rudd ultimately failed with the attempt, resulting in Michael Douglas saying "What are you? A f****** pervert?"

22. The size-shifting VFX (the outlines left by the body on shrinking/growing) were taken from the original "Ant-Man" comics, and was influenced by stop-motion and multiple exposure shots.

23. The VFX artists decided to incorporate techniques that would make this film different from other "shrinking" films and give an "experimental" look to the film. These techniques include macro photography (digital mattes of enlarged environments) and motion-capture. Trick photography was also employed: close-ups, aerial shots and long shots with wide lenses were the main techniques employed to get a good ambiance for Ant-Man in a giant environment.

24. Edgar Wright wanted the film to be completely stand-alone, with no references to the other films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. This plan did not match the studio plan for the Marvel Cinematic Universe. This, among other factors, led to Wright leaving.

25. Although Edgar Wright dropped out of the movie, a large portion of the script he wrote is still in the story.

26. According to Evangeline Lilly, Hope's role was much smaller in Edgar Wright's drafts. It was beefed up significantly during rewrites, with Lilly providing some ideas and input.

27. Paul Rudd worked on rewrites with Adam McKay. Michael Peña and Evangeline Lilly have said in interviews that many of the actors were consulted on their characters during the rewrite, which resulted in expanded roles.

28. (at around 46 mins) When Scott Lang tells Pym that their first move should be calling the Avengers, Pym responds by saying that they're probably busy making a city fall from the sky. This is a direct reference to the events in Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015).

29. On the day that they filmed the sequence of Cross shrinking a lamb, when they broke for lunch, the caterer just so happened to serve lamb chops. The cast and crew claimed it was an awkward meal.

30. The Yellowjacket armor is based on the G.I. Ant-Man armor from the "Irredeemable Ant-Man" comic. The suit's helmet also incorporates the facial features of Hank Pym's villainous robot Ultron.

31. When the role of Wasp (Hank Pym's lover and wife) was in the script, Rashida Jones and Emma Stone were considered for the part.

32. Paul Rudd and Adam McKay convinced Bobby Cannavale to do the film. Cannavale said, "They both called me and said, 'You've got to do this.' They called me before Marvel called." Cannavale felt that the big budget film's atmosphere felt more like an independent film, as he was able to improvise a lot with his fellow cast members.

33. The preview for the first teaser was ant-sized... Which is to say that it's almost completely impossible to tell what's going on in it. A human-sized trailer went up the next day.

34. According to the filmmakers, the main theme in this film is "passing the torch."

35. Corey Stoll describes his character of Darren Cross as a shadowy version of Hank Pym: "Cross is a guy who is not that dissimilar from Michael Douglas' character Hank Pym. A brilliant scientist, who is not ethically pure. The great thing about the whole movie is that everybody is in those shades of grey."

36. A sequence was filmed where Pym and Lang discuss the Ant-Man name. Lines from this exchange include "Lame, I know," "Iron Man was taken," and "Is it too late to change the name?" (Interestingly, Pym did adopt other monikers in the comics, including Ant-Man, Giant-Man, Goliath, Yellowjacket and Wasp.) These lines were featured in trailers and TV spots, but not the finished film.

37. The idea of a potential Ant-Man movie had been kicked around before Marvel had its own movie studio. Once the Marvel Cinematic Universe was founded, there were plans to include him in the Phase One films and be a member of the Avengers. Those plans fell through and he was supposed to have a film in Phase Two instead. The movie was then pushed back to becoming the first part of Phase Three, until it was decided that this movie would actually be the finale of Phase Two, after Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), and that Captain America: Civil War (2016) would lead Phase Three. In short, its release date didn't change so much as its classification.

38. Peyton Reed is a huge Marvel fan and seized the opportunity to direct a film in the MCU even if it meant stepping in at the last minute to take over a project previously helmed by Edgar Wright.

39. In the comics, Hank Pym's daughter Hope Pym (here she takes her mother's maiden name of Van Dyne) was a villainous character who acted out of resentment against her father. While that angle is present in this film, she is much more heroic and reasonable here.

40. Simon Pegg described Edgar Wright's script as 'daring, fun, funny and hugely exciting.'

41. In the comics, Hank Pym created Ultron. This movie is the next Marvel movie released after Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015).

42. Sean Bean, Pierce Brosnan and Gary Oldman were considered for the role of Hank Pym.

43. (at around 1h 45 mins) In the last scene of the film when Luis is telling Scott about a tip, the girl talking to the Sam Wilson/Falcon says, ''We got a guy who jumps, we got a guy who swings, we got a guy who crawls up the wall''. This is in direct reference to Spider-Man who made his debut in the MCU in Captain America: Civil War (2016).

44. Scott lives at the Milgrom Hotel. This was named after comic-book artist Al Milgrom.

45. During an interview with the film's star Paul Rudd on The Howard Stern Show (1990), Stern told Rudd he had tried - 15 years prior to the release of Ant-Man - to buy the rights from Marvel in hopes to translate it to the big screen.

46. Luis, played by Michael Peña, was based on a real friend of Peña, Pablo, who is a minor criminal and talks just as rapidly as Luis does.

47. Jessica Chastain turned down the lead female role of Hope van Dyne due to scheduling conflicts. She had previously bowed out of the role of Maya Hansen in Iron Man 3 (2013) for the same reason.

48. The first production to film in the sound stages at the new Pinewood Atlanta Studios. With the exception of Doctor Strange (2016), all of Marvel Studios' subsequent productions have been filmed entirely or in part at Pinewood.

49. While promoting Baby Driver (2017), Edgar Wright said he never watched the finished film, saying "It would kind of be like asking me, 'Do you want to watch your ex-girlfriend have sex?'"

50. Edgar Wright was responsible for casting Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lilly, David Dasmalchian and Michael Pena.

51. (at around 1h 14 mins) When Luis is posing as a guard, he whistles "It's a Small World". Not only is Ant-Man small, which makes the song appropriate, but the song is originally from a ride (Small World) at Disneyland, which, like Marvel Studios, is owned by The Walt Disney Company.

52. Paul Rudd is the second Parks and Recreation (2009) cast member to be cast as a main lead in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, after Chris Pratt as Star-Lord in Guardians of the Galaxy (2014).

53. Patrick Wilson was cast as Paxton. But after the movie was delayed, scheduling conflicts forced Wilson to drop out and Bobby Cannavale took the role. Wilson subsequently went onto appear on the DC Extended Universe's superhero films by voicing a role the following year as the President of the United States in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016) and co-starring in Aquaman.

54. (at around 1h 40 mins) If you watch closely as Scott shrinks towards the Microverse, you'll see a tardigrade on the right lower portion of the screen.

55. Adrien Brody, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and Ewan McGregor were all in the running for the role of Scott Lang.

56. Most of Ant-Man's action scenes were shot normally with VFX around him. The exception was the fight with Falcon: Anthony Mackie had to mime the actions of getting beaten by Ant-Man.

57. Michael Peña was actually stumbling over his words during the "telephone game" sequence.

58. Edgar Wright himself selected Paul Rudd for the role of Scott Lang based on his natural charisma, which would make Scott likable despite being a criminal in-story.

59. Peyton Reed revealed that Andrew Barrer and Gabriel Ferrari were also writers of the movie and but had to remain uncredited due to the Writers Guild. Dave Callaham also did a rewrite before filming.

60. Edgar Wright's drafts did not include the Wasp, save for a mention from Pym.

61. Marvel executive producer Victoria Alonso exclaimed one morning during filming, "You'll never believe it! I found an ant in my bathtub, and I saved it! I was talking to it!"

62. The building that was used for the Pym Technologies exterior set stored records for the city of Atlanta and was also used as the news studio in Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (2004), which also starred Paul Rudd.

63. Atoms consist of mostly empty space, as proven by Ernest Rutherford in his gold foil experiment. Therefore it is theoretically possible to shrink or expand material, although the means to do so are far beyond present day technology.

64. The director of this film, Peyton Reed, was considered to direct Guardians of the Galaxy (2014), another Marvel Studios film, which was later directed by James Gunn. Reed was also attached at one point, to direct Fantastic Four (2005), a film adaptation based on another Marvel property, that was released by 20th Century Fox.

65. After this film was released, Hope Pym was introduced into the Marvel Comics as Nadia Pym ("nadia" is Russian for "hope"), daughter of Hank Pym and a Hungarian scientist.

66. Jordan Peele was originally cast when Edgar Wright was still director.

67. Editor Dan Lebental said that despite Edgar Wright's departure and Peyton Reed joining the project, the studio still held onto the original release date. This meant that the film's post-production team lost 10 weeks of time in the process to complete the film. Lebental said that it certainly accelerated the workload on the editing, sound, visual effects and 3D rendering teams with their team doing the final mixing sound before some of the hundreds of visual effects shots even arrived for them. Lebental said that this is a norm in the business but this was an extreme situation, given Wright's departure and Reed joining.

68. Mary Elizabeth Winstead wanted to play The Wasp.

69. In Edgar Wright's drafts, Darren Cross's alter ego would have been Nano Warrior, instead of Yellowjacket. The drafts also featured a car chase sequence.

70. Peyton Reed originally wanted Rick Moranis who's known for portraying Wayne Szalinski in the Honey, I Shrunk the Kids films in the film for a cameo.

71. Edgar Wright has said, that despite working on "Ant-Man" for a decade, and leaving the project on his own terms, he cannot bring himself to watch the finished product.

72. Adam McKay, Ruben Fleischer, Rawson Marshall Thurber, Nicholas Stoller, Michael Dowseand David Wain were considered to direct the film.

73. (at around 3 mins) Writers Andrew Barrer and Gabriel Ferrari appear briefly in the film, as two prisoners during Scott Lang's escape from the jailhouse. Barrer's father also appears in the film (at around 18 mins), standing at the bar during the Hope/Cross dinner scene.

74. Hank Pym, Scott Lang and Clint Barton are the only superheroes in the MCU to have offspring (as well as Frank Castle in The Punisher). Hank and Scott are also the only heros to lose their wives (Janet Van Dyne apparently died at the Quantum Realm and Maggie divorced Scott). Coincidentally, Hank Pym, Scott Lang, and Clint Barton have all used Pym particles in the comics.

75. David Wain was considered to direct after Edgar Wright left the project.

76. Ant-Man is implied to have the ability to manipulate his weight and mass to be light and heavy whenever he wishes. This came from the DC Comics hero the Atom, who serves as Ant-Man's counterpart: both are heroes with shrinking abilities, and both started out as scientists who passed their titles down to others.

77. Patrick Wilson was cast as William Crossnote, but he left the project after Edgar Wright's departure, citing a scheduling conflict.

78. Michael Douglas was later considered for the role of Doc in Baby Driver (2017), Edgar Wright's next film after dropping out of this project. Kevin Spacey was ultimately cast.

79. This is the second super hero movie for actor David Dastmalchian. He previously appeared in The Dark Knight (2008) in a minor role as one of Joker's henchmen.

80. John Slattery and Anthony Mackie have appeared in other Marvel movies but have never shared any screen time. In another film The Adjustment Bureau (2011) they both appear onscreen at the same time.

81. This is the second time that a film from the MCU was released in theaters in July since Captain America: The First Avenger (2011).

82. The plot has similarities to both The Mask of Zorro (1998) and Batman Beyond (1999) - an older hero trains a thief to be his replacement and settle an old score.

83. David Dasmalchian said getting cast in this film couldn't have come at a better time, given that his wife was pregnant with their first child and they only had $400 in the bank. Dasmalchian initially feared that his casting was in jeopardy when Edgar Wright departed the project as Wright had personally emailed the actor. But the fear came to pass as new director Peyton Reed was a fan of the actor after his work in The Dark Knight and Passengers.

84. Edgar Wright's draft had the X-Con security team with approximately 6 or 7 members as opposed to the three in the finished film. Janet Van Dyne was also absent from the story.

85. CAMEO: Stan Lee: (at around 1h 45 mins) the bartender who says a woman looks "crazy stupid fine."

86. According to Peyton Reed when it came to using Thomas the Tank Engine during the battle sequence on Cassie's train set, there were certain stipulations when it came to showing the character. Reed and the team met with the rights holders of Thomas and had to make a presentation. The owners stipulated that Thomas couldn't be depicted as doing anything evil, had to remain neutral and no character could be tied to a train track that Thomas was going to be on, as the owners were very protective. Reed was happy with using Thomas as it helped add to the personality of the film, and that the owners found the use of Thomas funny in the film.

87. Hank Pym wants Scott to use the Ant-Man technology to pull off a heist. In the comics, Lang stole the Ant-Man suit from Pym in hopes of pulling off enough heists to save his sick daughter; when Pym found out, he allowed him to keep the suit as long as he used it for heroic purposes.

88. Cassie Lang is delighted at her father's superhero career, even adopting an ant as a pet. In the comics Scott's daughter Cassie eventually dons the Ant-Man costume herself to become the heroine Giant-Girl (later Stature).

89. Yellowjacket in this film is a combination of Ant-Man villains Yellowjacket (a mentally unstable alter ego of Pym), Darren Cross (a villainous businessman and enemy of Scott Lang) and Eric O'Grady (an amoral and selfish person with Pym tech who also was the fourth Ant-Man).

90. Janet van Dyne (Wasp) ends up shrinking herself into a microscopic dimension and was presumed dead. This was her fate in the Marvel comic "Secret Invasion".

91. (at around 5 mins) Scott's Baskin-Robbins name tag says "Jack" which is understandable considering he was hiding the fact he was just released from prison. He then asks his co-worker "Darby" to take over at the register while he speaks to the manager. Jack and Darby are The names of Paul Rudd's children in real life.

92. The ending was supposed to have a showdown between Ant-Man and Carson, with Ant-Man defeating him and reclaiming the stolen sample of Pym Particles. The ending was changed to Carson escaping and presumably delivering the sample to HYDRA in order to set up Captain America: Civil War (2016).

93. (at around 13 mins) When Cross brings the Hydra agents into the room where the Yellowjacket suit is stored, one of them has part of a tattoo showing above his collar. It is the symbol of the "Ten Rings" terrorist group that kidnapped Tony Stark in the first Iron Man (2008) film.

94. (at around 18 mins) When Cross shrinks a board member and implodes him into a tiny blob, strawberry jam was used for the blob.

95. Another ending was filmed that is closure-related. In it Scott Lang tracks down and confronts Mitchell, who knew that Carson took the Pym Particles sample during the confrontation at the lab. It was filmed as a measure of ambiguity in the event it was needed. The producers eventually decided to leave it out as a future plot point in either of another tie-in or in the sequel.

96. When Scott is shrinking to microscopic size he appears to shrink into a forest. This could allude to the Microverse. In Marvel comics its a whole world on subatomic level.

97. Scott is able to enlarge some items in size during the film, including himself. This is a homage to Giant-Man, in the comics Hank Pym's superhero title due to him relying more on growing to gigantic size rather than shrinking.

98. The original opening that Edgar Wright wrote was to have a mini-adventure (in homage of Goldfinger (1964)) that the young Hank Pym would infiltrate Panama to retrieve a microfilm and confronted a Panamanian general by the name of Castillo. Jordi Mollà had filmed his scenes as Castillo but was cut. Peyton Reed admitted that while the standalone adventure was really cool, although filmed, it was disconnected after it was edited together. Reed eventually settled for the existing prologue which bookmarks the confrontation with Mitchell and Hank later on.

99. All the movie (closing film of Phase Two in the Marvel Cinematic Universe) shares many similarities with Iron Man (2008) (first film of Phase One in the Marvel Cinematic Universe):
-A revolutionary and technologically advanced crime-fighting suit is replicated (and modified to be more lethal), by a former friend/partner of the suit's inventor, who has ambitions to sell the technology to people with nefarious purposes, expressly against the wishes of the inventor.
-In an effort to protect this from happening, and protect someone he loves, the hero must use the suit beyond its expected capabilities to defeat the villain, resulting in the villain's death as his own suit is destroyed.
-The hero is endangered by the technology he uses (Obadiah extracts from Tony Stark's breast the mechanism that prevents the shrapnel inside his blood from arriving at his heart to kill him, and Scott Lang uses the special system of the suit to defeat Cross, reducing his size to enter in the Quantum Realm).
-The hero trains to use the suit with comic results (Tony Stark crashes sometimes while he constructs the first armor, and Scott Lang increases his size before the right time, crashing against the ground).
-A woman turns into the assistant of the hero (Pepper Potts for Tony Stark, and Hope Pym for Scott Lang).
-Love interest between the hero and his assistant (Tony Stark and Pepper Potts, Scott Lang and Hope Pym).
-Both movies also end with the implication that the heroes' actions have earned them consideration for joining the Avengers.
-The main villain of the movie is bald (Obadiah Stane in Iron Man, Darren Cross in Ant-Man).
-The villain dies by the suit he creates (Stark collapses Stane's armor, who falls to crash against the Arc Reactor of the laboratory, and Lang collapses Cross's armor, who vanishes in the Quantum Realm).
-Presentation of a hero for a sequel (War Machine in Iron Man, The Wasp in Ant-Man).

100. The climax, when Scott shrinks to sub-atomic levels and enters the quantum realm, is a tribute to the Disneyland attraction, Adventure Thru Inner Space. Open from 1967 through 1985, the attraction shrunk guests as they got smaller till they became the size of an atom. Hank warns Scott by saying, "It means that you would enter a reality where all concepts of time and space become irrelevant as you shrink for all eternity." This same quote is repeated when Scott is in the quantum realm, though it echoes, similar to the Paul Frees quote from the attraction, "They will be our only source of contact once you have passed beyond the limits of normal Mag-ni-fi-ca-tion"
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2018.09.14 06:22 tspore Full Stack Engineer

Engineering

Los Angeles, CA, USA

What is HITRECORD?

Founded and led by actor and artist Joseph Gordon-Levitt, HITRECORD is an open online community for creative collaboration. Users don’t just post about themselves and vie for attention; they work together on a variety of art and media projects that they couldn’t have completed on their own.
So far, HITRECORD has operated as a successful production company, winning an Emmy for its television show, partnering with numerous brands from Samsung and LG to the ACLU, paying contributing community members a total of nearly three million dollars.
With over 700,000 registered users, our next step is to evolve from a PRODUCTION COMPANY into a PLATFORM​.
Our mission is to bring as many people as possible the experience of creativity through collaboration.

About the Role:

HITRECORD is hiring a full-time developer looking to be part of a small dynamic team which is quick to build and deploy products to the market. Our developers have a lot of ownership and autonomy as we continue to build out existing and new products that directly affect our larger community of hundreds of thousands of users. We have a test-driven culture that values opinions, empathy, assertiveness and creativity where every team member has a huge impact on the overall business, especially our fullstack developers, who work across almost every area and aspect of the product.
Applicants must be currently authorized to work in the United States on a full-time basis now and in the future. This position does not offer sponsorship.

About you:

Preferred Qualifications

What You Will Be Doing

submitted by tspore to rubyjobs [link] [comments]


2018.09.14 06:11 tspore Front End Engineer

Engineering

Los Angeles, CA, USA

What is HITRECORD?

Founded and led by actor and artist Joseph Gordon-Levitt, HITRECORD is an open online community for creative collaboration. Users don’t just post about themselves and vie for attention; they work together on a variety of art and media projects that they couldn’t have completed on their own.
So far, HITRECORD has operated as a successful production company, winning an Emmy for its television show, partnering with numerous brands from Samsung and LG to the ACLU, paying contributing community members a total of nearly three million dollars.
With over 700,000 registered users, our next step is to evolve from a PRODUCTION COMPANY into a PLATFORM​.
Our mission is to bring as many people as possible the experience of creativity through collaboration.

About the Role:

HITRECORD is hiring a full-time front end developer looking to be part of a small dynamic team which is quick to build and deploy products to the market. Our developers have a lot of ownership and autonomy as we continue to build out existing and new products that directly affect our larger community of hundreds of thousands of users. Most of our team is made up of fullstack developers so this role will be the first person to focus exclusively on the front end. We have a test-driven culture that values opinions, empathy, assertiveness and creativity where every team member has a huge impact on the overall business. This is an exciting opportunity to see your code showcased on a world stage where it will affect hundreds of thousands of people.
Applicants must be currently authorized to work in the United States on a full-time basis now and in the future. This position does not offer sponsorship.

Basic Qualifications

Preferred Qualifications

What You Will Be Doing

To apply - https://hire.withgoogle.com/public/jobs/hitrecordorg/view/P_AAAAAAFAACvF-ttGwS6bz6
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2018.08.10 17:06 AGoodJoe_ Pornography Addiction in Film- Don Jon by Joseph Gordon Levitt

Don Jon is a 2013 rom-com drama written and directed by Joseph Gordon Levitt. It also stars Joseph Gordon Levitt, Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore, Tony Danza, Glenne Headly, and Brie Larson. Here's the trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6615kYTpOSU
From the opening scene of the film, we follow Levitt's character Jon Martello in a wonderful opening sequence where he gives a shortlist of the things he truly cares about: "my body, my pad, my ride, my family, my church, my girls, my porn." As the scene plays out, we see that for the most part, Jon has his life in order. Down to the very methodology of cleaning his apartment, he is a detail oriented man with a good social life- he has no problem in sexual encounters with other women, of which are frequent. As indicated in his opening monologue, his familial relationships are in order, he regularly attends church, the guy is even in good physical health. His problem however, comes when he meets Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson), a wonderful (or is she?) girl he meets at a club that he simply can't let go of.
To spare some details and time, the movie touches on many themes I personally found very relatable, and that fit into this sub like a fucking glass slipper. The main one, of course, being his pornography addiction. I'm not going to spoil this flick for you guys, but understand that somewhere along the way of meeting and dating Barbara, Jon realizes his pornography addiction simply can't work within his new relationship. With that, we are given a gorgeous film that gives an impeccably accurate depiction of an addiction we have all faced are all still facing.
In respect to the film Joseph Gordon Levitt has created, I will say this is more than just a movie about porn and its effects on one's life. The film touches on the kind of hollywood fueled, fantastical expectations a man can have to live up to for his woman- and how much like pornography addiction in young men, these fantasies shaped by Disney princesses and The Notebook can similarly affect women and what they look for in relationships. All that being said, Don Jon is a film that deals with loss, hookup culture, and what it means to be in a loving relationship. I also would like to go on the record saying that Julianne Moore's character gives a monologue towards the end of the film on porn, on how it is one sided and can twist a partner's image of what is healthy and acceptable in a relationship. When I saw said scene, I couldn't believe that such a sequence in a mainstream Hollywood film would so perfectly encapsulate the standards of forums like pornfree and nofap.
In summary, I love the fact that Joseph Gordon Levitt portrays someone who is functioning in society and in good health, yet has still fallen into the abyss of pornography addiction. It's quite a brilliant idea to pitch to large, mainstream audiences, who I feel might have had different images in their head of what a porn addict might look like.
I see Don Jon as more of an intellectual character study than a forgettable rom com from 2013, and it just so happens to be THE movie for recovering porn addicts.
That being said, even though I've already mentioned that this isn't a movie solely about porn, I must warn:
Don Jon has sequences with pornography in the film. It has a very high potential to distress recovering porn addicts, and I only recommend this film to those who feel that they are in control of their urges and can manage their behavior when seeing this material.
submitted by AGoodJoe_ to pornfree [link] [comments]


2018.07.13 17:29 TheOrangVegetal Weird ass dream in crystal clear details from askreddit

I was an agent working for a secret organization that specialized in dealing with paranormal and extradimensional anomalies.
One of the best parts of the job was the outfits we could wear- sick leather jackets, sick leather gloves, black pants and sick leather shoes. clicks tongue NOICE. I looked especially hot and so did my partner, who was essentially the blonde version of Gordon Joseph Levitt. We were one of the best teams the organization had, one of the elite.
Our specialty was dealing with the extradimensional anomalies that would result in two of the same people occupying the same...universe. So we go out on a very sensititve case. There's this woman, a mother. Reports are saying that she's been seen in various places around town, but she's still at home with her kids at the same time. We called it a dimensional anomaly, or an instance where two people have somehow come to occupy the same space. Now when this happens, a balance is thrown off. Two people are occupying the same space, which means that there is a universe that is now absent of that other person. Balance has to be restored and as some of you know, nature's way of restoring balance isn't always nice. When this happens, a creature manifests itself through a ground portal and consumes the person it chooses from the bottom and up. Usually lots of blood.
So we enter this lady's home and start interviewing her after she puts away the kids. She goes into the kitchen to get something in the middle of the interview. Suddenly the outside world is covered in this hazy fog, as if the house is being isolated in its own space, like a pocket dimension. Then just like your classic horror flick, the lights start flickering until they're completely out. The darkness that follows is something out of nightmares, a thick impenetrable darkness that no light could shine through. My partner quickly rushes into the kitchen to ensure the woman's safety and brings her back into the living room where we begin to secure the situation. The shit gets real.
The entire house begins to quake violently, furniture sliding around the hardwood floor, paintings are falling off the wall. The ground opens up in the center of the room, giving way to a shimmering blood red light from within the portal. Out of it sprouts a creature that looks like a human whose been sent through an industrial furnace, covered in blood. The lady is pulled by her feet by an unseen force towards the portal and the creature disappears just underneath with the woman's feet in tow. This is the worst part of the dream. The screaming.
The way these creatures consume is similar to how a deli slicer works. Each sweep takes more and more of this poor woman. More blood and flesh is being ejected out of the portal. Me and my partner were only trained to use one method, but it was effective. Forcefully administer a chemical water mix, and these "pills"down the throat of the victim. They acted as a repellent to the creature, and made her body resistent to the force of the portal. However this time, nothing was working. The creature was working away at the woman an increasing pace, and her screaming was excruciating. I was doing my best, but pretty soon her lower legs were gone, then the left leg, then the right leg. She wasn't screaming anymore...
I sat back and just accepted defeat. We weren't going to be able to save her. My partner was becoming desperate and yanked my supplies from me and began administering them to her. His hands were shaking and covered in blood, and spreading it all over her expressionless face. She was still being consumed. I watched in defeat as he was becoming increasingly distraught, yelling and cursing,"COME ON, DAMMIT!!", tears running down his face. I tried to get him away, but this was too much for him to handle. This was unlike anything we had experienced before.
Half her torso and her arms below the elbow are gone. So much blood.
Soon nothing is left but her head and neck. My partner is in hysterics, still forcing the chemical cocktail down her mouth only for it to spill out of her neck...
That's when I woke up. I really wish I knew where this shit comes from. I guess my mind is fucked.
submitted by TheOrangVegetal to copypasta [link] [comments]


2018.06.12 01:50 PolyShaun What is HitRecord, Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s creator organization partnering with Ubisoft?

What is HitRecord, Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s creator organization partnering with Ubisoft? submitted by PolyShaun to polygondotcom [link] [comments]


2018.06.11 22:18 FraggedFoundry E3 2018: Beyond Good and Evil 2 Partners with Joseph Gordon-Levitt's HitRecord

E3 2018: Beyond Good and Evil 2 Partners with Joseph Gordon-Levitt's HitRecord submitted by FraggedFoundry to gaming [link] [comments]


2018.03.23 14:00 TheExtractor55 Brick: The Humble Beginnings of One of Popular Cinema’s Greatest New Directors

(Note: this is my first essay I’ve written for this sub. Just wanted to show my thoughts on one of my favorite movies. Read and enjoy)
Rian Johnson’s filmmaking resumé seems to grow by the second. He has made one of the greatest time-travel films in years with LOOPER, he directed some of TV’s greatest drama’s greatest episodes across BREAKING BAD’s five-season run, and he has gifted the STAR WARS franchise with its most enthralling entry in 35 years. However, despite his rapid ascension into the spotlight of popular cinema, I’ve seen a surprising widespread disregard for Johnson’s roots, which is a missed opportunity for many to experience one of the greatest neo-noir films to ever be made. BRICK, Johnson’s first film, is a unabashedly enthusiastic masterpiece, in which Johnson plays with the American film noir conventions that so obviously inspired his cinephilia.
Made on a $475,000 budget of which the bulk was donated by friends and family, BRICK explores a familiar story in an unfamiliar setting (at least, unfamiliar for the genre). The murder of a young woman and an assortment of drug kingpins and enforcers are not foreign elements in the novels of Dashiell Hammett (Johnson’s greatest influence in terms of BRICK) or Raymond Chandler and the classic films starring Humphrey Bogart as an unsentimental detective on the rough streets of Los Angeles. But these obligatory story elements only strengthen the tone of the movie: it is a classic noir film, but in a high-school setting. Rather than the over-the-hill heroes and twenty-something heiresses as our principal protagonists, we have fresh-faced students to root for.
Every archetype is present: Brendan (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is our detective, Brain (Matt O’Leary) is the knowledgeable partner and informant, Pin (Lukas Haas) and Tug (Noah Fleiss) are our respective boss and enforcer, Emily (Emilie de Ravin) is the innocent young woman that gets in too deep, and there are (count ‘em) TWO femme fatales: Kara (Meagan Good) and Laura (Nora Zehetner). And yes, these characters are based around decades-old outlines employed by countless crime writers in order to mimic the most successful of these stories in hopes of easy profit. But it’s the setting that Johnson places them in that completely transforms them into tired plot devices into vibrant characters.
BRICK speaks the language of classic film, both literally and thematically. Even though these characters are young students attending a California high school, most speak with the quick-witted and noir lingo that populated the vernacular of cinema’s greatest detective stories, from THE THIN MAN to THE BIG SLEEP to THE MALTESE FALCON. This idea certainly has gimmick potential, but Johnson plays it totally straight, with each calculated response delivered with the deadly seriousness of the contemplations of troubled youth. It is with these solemn regard for the tropes of the genre that BRICK becomes a tribute, rather than a parody. When Brendan says that he’s “got knives in my eyes” without a knowing smirk or junkie Dode tells him to “leave the low life to the low lifers and dangle” without irony, Johnson is bringing you deeper and deeper into the fantastical world of classic film that he undoubtedly dreamed of during his own adolescent years.
Upon closer inspection, however, the world and characters of BRICK have another layer. While Brendan, Pin, Dode, and most of the other principle characters of the film (even one of the adults!) speak in this detective shoptalk, not every one of them is committed to this kind of speech. In an early scene, when Brendan speaks to his ex-girlfriend and eventual murder victim Emily on a pay phone, both drop the colloquialisms in lieu of a more relatable and awkward conversational tone before their conversation is rudely interrupted by the aforementioned antagonists. Later, during a confrontation between Pin and Brendan in an informal setting that comes nowhere close to the shadows that both prefer to operate from within, both abandon their lingo yet again. These small scenes remind us that this world isn’t a fantasy or alternate reality in which students speak like Bogart and Bacall; they are simply children playing cops and robbers. Brendan, obviously lonely and heartbroken, copes with his frustrating and tragic life like Spade or Marlowe would: by being cold towards those around him and pursuing the case with as little emotion as he can muster. The Pin, with his unbelievable flamboyant style of crime, is, when considered carefully, a delusional child as well.
And why wouldn’t these kids turn to Hammett for solace? Each one is stuck in the often mind-numbing experience of adolescence, so tired of monotony that they create danger and peril for their own pleasure. The stakes of BRICK are real, but they are the product of children taking their love of film noir and detective fiction a bit too far.
But even though the film noir environment of BRICK may be a product of its characters’ thirst for excitement, it is also a product of Rian Johnson’s passion for such stories. His love of classic film is pervasive throughout the film, permeating every frame, exchange, and character archetype. Without knowledge of Johnson’s influences, BRICK is nonetheless an exciting mystery complemented by some remarkable performances. But being in on the joke makes BRICK a revelatory experience; a film that wears its inspirations on its sleeve and then runs with them, created by a director so in love with film noir that his enthusiasm reflects off every carefully orchestrated shot.
So maybe it isn’t such a surprise that BRICK hasn’t caught on. It is a film for film buffs, by a film buff. Unlike Tarantino’s cinephilia, which is ever-present but not a requirement when it comes to great appreciation of his films, Johnson’s love of classic cinema is essential to the appreciation of his first film. Those with love for Johnson’s other work should definitely seek out this film. Just make sure you’ve done your homework.
submitted by TheExtractor55 to TrueFilm [link] [comments]


2017.09.22 15:08 subreddit_stats Subreddit Stats: MovieSuggestions top posts from 2011-08-16 to 2017-09-21 01:36 PDT

Period: 2227.79 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 19072
Rate (per day) 0.45 8.56
Unique Redditors 575 6640
Combined Score 55128 61366

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 3837 points, 61 submissions: Tevesh_CKP
    1. [Suggest] Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang - A hilarious homage to the noir genre, Robert Downey Jr. plays an idiot who gets caught in some Hollywood powerplay, gets partnered with Val Kilmer and has to deal with his high school crush Michelle Monaghan with all her baggage. Written and Directed by Shane Black. (166 points, 13 comments)
    2. [Suggest] Thank You for Smoking - A movie about learning to argue. The protagonist is a spokesman on behalf on cigarettes but he's still trying to be a good father. (152 points, 9 comments)
    3. [Suggest] Triangle - One of the best mystery movies that you should go completely blind into. Don't watch the trailer, don't read the wiki - it'll ruin it for you. When you're in the mood for a good mind screw, watch Triangle. (152 points, 30 comments)
    4. [Suggest] FFS watch Kubo and the Two Strings in theatre! (RT: 84%, IMDB: 8.3) Don't let an animation studio take a massive loss when they've made such a beautiful film. (130 points, 19 comments)
    5. [Suggest] Pontypool - Nothing like your typical Zombie movie; Pontypool is a thriller about a Radio Announcer stating the details of how his town is being overrun. (106 points, 15 comments)
    6. [Suggest] 50/50 - Hilarious and heart wrenching, 50/50 catalogues a man's journey after being diagnosed with cancer. (101 points, 21 comments)
    7. [Suggest] The Princess Bride - An amazing adventure movie that the whole family can enjoy. I was talking to a few people who had never heard of it and realized the movie is 30 years old. If you're looking for fun, check it out! (99 points, 14 comments)
    8. [Suggest] Enemy at the Gates - Russian Sniper garners so much fame during the Battle of Stalingrad that the Germans send their best to end his growing legend. With Jude Law, Ed Harris, Rachel Weisz, Bob Hoskins, Ron Perlman and Joseph Fiennes. (85 points, 10 comments)
    9. [Suggest] In Bruges - A black comedy that homages the noir genre, Colin Ferrell is a hitman forced to take a vacation in the city of Bruges after his last job went awry. (85 points, 10 comments)
    10. [Suggest] The Handmaiden - An erotic thriller about a thief being sent to a mansion to swindle the heiress but no one is who they claim to be. (83 points, 17 comments)
  2. 1321 points, 22 submissions: j1202
    1. [SUGGEST] Hard Candy (2005) - A thriller film focusing on a 14-year-old vigilante meeting a man she suspects is a paedophile. Starring Ellen Page and Patrick Wilson. (IMDB: 7.2, RT: 68%) (112 points, 16 comments)
    2. [SUGGEST] The Boy and the Beast (2015) - Amazing animated movie where a young orphaned boy living on the streets stumbles upon a fantastic world of beasts and is taken in by a gruff warrior beast looking for an apprentice. {IMDB: 7.7 , RT: 91%} (109 points, 2 comments)
    3. [SUGGEST] Predestination (2014) - Science fiction mystery thriller film. A temporal agent (Ethan Hawke) embarks on a final time-traveling assignment to prevent an elusive criminal from launching an attack that kills thousands of people. {IMDB: 7.4, RT 84%} (85 points, 13 comments)
    4. [SUGGEST] The Invitation (2015) - While attending a dinner party at his former house, a man (Logan Marshall-Green) starts to believe that his ex-wife and her new husband have sinister plans for the guests. {IMDB: 6.7, RT: 88%} (78 points, 13 comments)
    5. [SUGGEST] The Voices (2014) - Intense dark yet comedic film where a likable but mentally unhinged man (Ryan Reynolds) pursues his office crush with the help of his talking pets (good dog and evil cat) but things unexpectedly turn sinister. Co- stars Gemma Arterton, Anna Kendrick. IMDB: 6.3, RT: 72% (72 points, 14 comments)
    6. [SUGGEST] Fracture (2007) - Story of a man (Anthony Hopkins) accused of attempted murder on his wife who gets locked in a battle of wits with a young assistant district attorney (Ryan Gosling). (RT Rating: 72%) (69 points, 9 comments)
    7. [SUGGEST] Akira (1988) - Animated science fiction action thriller film about a secret military project endangers Neo-Tokyo when it turns a biker gang member into a rampaging psionic psychopath. (IMDB: 8.1, RT: 87%) (65 points, 14 comments)
    8. [SUGGEST] Dogtooth (2009) - Three teenagers live isolated, without leaving their house, because their over-protective parents say they can only leave when their dogtooth falls out. {IMDB: 7.2, RT: 92%} (61 points, 23 comments)
    9. [SUGGEST] Shallow Grave (1994) - Danny Boyle's directorial debut, a thriller where three friends discover their new flatmate dead but loaded with cash. Starring Ewan McGregor and Christopher Eccleston. {IMDB: 7.4, RT: 72%} (59 points, 7 comments)
    10. [SUGGEST] October Sky (1999) - The true story of Homer Hickam(Jake Gyllenhaal), a coal miner's son who was inspired by the first Sputnik launch to take up rocketry against his father's wishes. (IMDB: 7.8, RT: 90%) (57 points, 9 comments)
  3. 855 points, 17 submissions: HeisenBrow
    1. [SUGGEST] Warrior. A broken family can only find redemption through fighting. Amazing martial arts film with stellar performances by Tom Hardy, Joel Edgerton and Nick Nolte. (76 points, 11 comments)
    2. [SUGGEST] The Imposter. The story of how a young man tricked a family into believing he was their missing son who disappeared for three years. Read nothing more about it. (75 points, 7 comments)
    3. [SUGGEST] The Conversation. A less famous film by Francis Ford Coppola. A great surveillance and paranoia story that still works for today's world. (64 points, 9 comments)
    4. [SUGGEST] Why Don't You Play in Hell? (2014). Absolutely batshit INSANE japanese film about yakuza fights and movie making. One of the most fun experiences I've had this year. (59 points, 5 comments)
    5. [SUGGEST] Restrepo. Powerful documentary about the life on a platoon stationed in one of Afghanistan's deadliest places. (57 points, 3 comments)
    6. [SUGGEST] What We Do In The Shadows. Absolutely hilarious mockumentary about the daily routine of four vampires sharing a flat in Wellington, New Zealand. (52 points, 3 comments)
    7. [SUGGEST] Coherence. A group of friends is having a dinner party, when strange things start to happen. For fans of Primer and Triangle. (51 points, 10 comments)
    8. [SUGGEST] The One I Love (2014). Great indie flick that will leave you thinking about it. It's best to go in without knowing too much beforehand. (51 points, 7 comments)
    9. [SUGGEST] Wild Tales. Absolutely brilliant dark humour film focusing on revenge and our deepest impulses. One of the best films from last year. [IMDB 8.3] (50 points, 11 comments)
    10. [SUGGEST] Das Boot. One of the greatest. Extremely intense, atmospheric and claustrophobic war movie following the members of a German submarine in WWII [IMDB 8.5] (47 points, 15 comments)
  4. 829 points, 17 submissions: buuutwhy
    1. [SUGGEST] - Paprika (2006) - surreal anime with a bit of mind-fucker-y about a therapist who investigates the stealing of a machine that can see the user's dreams. RT=83% (65 points, 12 comments)
    2. [SUGGEST] - Robot&Frank (2012) - cool, bittersweet movie about the friendship between an ex-cat burglar and his robot - RT=86% (63 points, 4 comments)
    3. [SUGGEST] - Throne of Blood (1957) - Macbeth set in feudal Japan, an experienced general tries everything in order to become lord of Spider Web's castle. RT = 98% (63 points, 9 comments)
    4. [SUGGEST] - A fish called Wanda (1998) - funny movie as four very different people try to doublecross each other. RT = 93% (58 points, 7 comments)
    5. [SUGGEST] - Mysterious Skin (2004) - Disturbing, yet touching drama, starring JGL, it is better to know as little as possible of the plot. RT=84% (57 points, 11 comments)
    6. [SUGGEST] - The Network (1976) - Sidney Lumet offers a cynical view of the tv news world in this movie with Faye Dunaway and William Holden. RT = 91% (54 points, 13 comments)
    7. [SUGGEST] - Waking Life (2001) - a man tries to find the meaning of life and universe through various surreal conversations. RT = 80% (53 points, 20 comments)
    8. [SUGGEST] - Stalker (1979) - Tarkovsky movie about a guide that helps two men find a room that grants wishes in a place called the Zone. RT = 100% (51 points, 6 comments)
    9. [SUGGEST] - Stand by me (1986) - a writer recalls an adventure from his childhood. Coming of age story about 4 boys, based on the novel by Stephen King. RT=91% (47 points, 6 comments)
    10. [SUGGEST] - The Vanishing (1988) - creepy, unsettling movie regarding the case of a young woman who disappears. RT = 100% (47 points, 3 comments)
  5. 809 points, 18 submissions: confusionion
    1. Kung Fu Hustle (Action/comedy 2005) RT=90%. Instantly engaging kung fu comedy antics you are guaranteed to love if you like Shaun of the Dead, Airplane, and other crossover style films. (79 points, 10 comments)
    2. [Suggest] Hot Rod. IMDB=6.7, RT=40%. Grade-A avante garde long-form sketch comedy, and a reminder that critical reviews offer a limited perspective on audience taste. (75 points, 30 comments)
    3. Dredd [2013] MC=59/100, users 8.4/10. Science Fiction action at its best. An excellent reboot of the original much more faithful to the source material. (67 points, 24 comments)
    4. Harry Brown(2009) IMDB score = 7.3/10. Elderly ex-serviceman seeks justice on neighborhood chavs. (60 points, 8 comments)
    5. A Prophet (2009) IMDB=8.0/10, RT=97%. Young Arab man is sent to a French Prison only to begin working for the Mafia. Great tense story. (47 points, 7 comments)
    6. Take Shelter (2011) IMDB=7.6/10, RT=92%. Small town family struggles with father's apparently dwindling sanity. (44 points, 7 comments)
    7. Favorite film with an anti-hero protagonist. (43 points, 54 comments)
    8. [strong suggestion]Garth Merenghi's: Darkplace (tv, but only 6 25min episodes, so basically movie length). I'd put this one off for a while. Don't do the same. Utter hilarity. Think Dead Alive as a hospital daytime soap in mockumentary form. (42 points, 9 comments)
    9. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. (2007) IMDB=7.5/10. Odd, yet gripping historic-fiction about a super-powered man's pursuit of the perfect scent from the director of the excellent Lola Rennt (Run Lola Run). (41 points, 6 comments)
    10. Big Fan (2009) IMDB=6.8/10, RT=88%. Pitch black comedy excellently lead by Patton Oswalt. (40 points, 5 comments)
  6. 748 points, 7 submissions: basisvector
    1. Oldboy (2003) - a dark but compelling South Korean film about a man kidnapped and imprisoned for 15 years. Once released, he begins a quest to find out why. (200 points, 32 comments)
    2. Let the Right One In (2008) - an intriguing portrayal of the life of a young vampire girl as she attempts to befriend a local boy. Easily one of the best in the genre. (173 points, 27 comments)
    3. Sunshine - A space thriller that is visually compelling, engaging from start to finish, and surprisingly well-cast. Cillian Murphy, in particular, delivers a great performance. (120 points, 32 comments)
    4. Brick - a rich film noir featuring an amazing performance by Joseph Gordon-Levitt. (100 points, 21 comments)
    5. About Time (2013) - a playful coming-of-age story with a delightfully absurd plot, brilliant acting, and perfect ambiance. Go into this one cold; it's most definitely more than the sum of its parts. (83 points, 26 comments)
    6. Rashomon (1950) - a crime is recalled differently by those involved to a court attempting to ensure justice is done. It's an outstanding example of Japanese cinema by the legendary Akira Kurosawa. (36 points, 4 comments)
    7. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966) - Sergio Leone concludes the Man with No Name "trilogy" with this masterful film characterized by genre-defining vistas, sounds, and styles. (36 points, 17 comments)
  7. 650 points, 9 submissions: yes_affirmative
    1. Four Lions (2010) - A dark comedy about four inept British Muslims who fancy themselves to be Jihadists (156 points, 12 comments)
    2. [SUGGEST] The Guard (2011) - An Irish comedy about an ill-behaved policeman who is forced to team up with an FBI agent to take down a global cocaine-smuggling enterprise (99 points, 13 comments)
    3. [SUGGEST] This Is England (2006) - After his father's death in the Falklands War, a young boy finds hope and camaraderie amongst a gang of skinheads. (80 points, 6 comments)
    4. [SUGGEST] "Only Lovers Left Alive" (2013) - A pair of long-married, cultured vampires come together when the husband sinks into a depression. Subdued and darkly funny, with some incredible original music and superb performances from Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton. (69 points, 7 comments)
    5. [SUGGEST] Monsters (2010) - An indie sci-fi film about a photojournalist who agrees to escort a tourist through a massive extraterrestrial-infected region of Mexico to the US border. From the director of the upcoming Godzilla film. (60 points, 13 comments)
    6. [SUGGEST] Once (2006) - A contemporary musical about a street musician and a Czech immigrant in Dublin who meet and begin to write and record music together. Stars Glen Hansard of The Frames/The Swell Season. (54 points, 5 comments)
    7. [SUGGEST] 13 Assassins (2010) - One of the best samurai films produced in recent memory, a grisly masterpiece directed by Takashi Miike. (49 points, 5 comments)
    8. [SUGGEST] Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990) - A funny and philosophical reimagining of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" from the perspective of the title characters, played by Gary Oldman and Tim Roth. (43 points, 4 comments)
    9. [SUGGEST] Calvary (2014) - After an Irish priest is threatened to be killed by one of his parishioners, he is given seven days to get his house in order. (40 points, 10 comments)
  8. 595 points, 10 submissions: PunkandCannonballer
    1. [Suggest] Cashback. After a breakup, Ben can't sleep, so he occupies his extra time with a job where he passes the time in an unconventional, fantastical way. (96 points, 30 comments)
    2. [Suggest] Punch-Drunk Love: Adam Sandler plays en emotionally damaged man just trying not be so lonely, to find someone who loves who he is, despite all his problems and shortcomings (RT 79%) (80 points, 22 comments)
    3. Disturbia (2007): A well-conceived, well-executed thriller about a young kid put on house arrest and spying on his neighbors to pass the time. The more he watches, the more he suspects one of his neighbors may be a serial killer. RT: 68% (71 points, 16 comments)
    4. [Suggest] Constantine- An underrated film about a Con-Man/"Supernatural Detective" (played by Keanu Reeves) dealing with angels and demons. A great supernatural action film. (62 points, 26 comments)
    5. [Suggest] Crazy, Stupid, Love RT 78% This romantic comedy is a cut above most of the usual fare, showing a lot of heart, genuine emotion, and some great moments of self-awareness. Very funny, very honest, and very good (58 points, 5 comments)
    6. [Suggest] The Descent: A wonderfully shot atmospheric horror film that revolves around a group of friends getting stuck in a cave system and encountering disturbing creatures. (58 points, 18 comments)
    7. [Suggest] Byzantium, a vampire film that focuses on the unbearable loneliness that comes with immortality. A fresh spin on a tired formula. RT: 62% (55 points, 10 comments)
    8. [Suggest] Hot Tub Time Machine: The title says it all, except that instead of being a stupid waste of time, this film is smart, rough, and genuinely hilarious. RT: 63% (52 points, 24 comments)
    9. [Suggest] Knights of Badassdom: This film is nothing more than stupid fun, but that's really all it needs to be. After breaking up with his girlfriend, Joe goes with his friends to LARP the pain away, and they accidentally summon a demon from hell. (34 points, 5 comments)
    10. [Suggest] What Maisie Knew- A bitter custody battle is seen through the eyes of a little girl. A well-shot, beautifully acted film. RT: 87% (29 points, 0 comments)
  9. 541 points, 9 submissions: idonotownakindle
    1. [SUGGEST] Catch Me If You Can (2002) Great Biographical comedy crime film starring Tom Hanks and Leonardo DiCaprio. / A true story about Frank Abagnale Jr., who, before his 19th birthday, successfully conned millions of dollars' worth of checks as a Pan Am pilot, doctor, and legal prosecutor (111 points, 10 comments)
    2. [SUGGEST] Submarine / A fantastic coming of age story about a boy who has to juggle his relationship as he tries to fix his parent's marriage. / A really quirky, charming and well directed debut film from Richard Ayoade. (86 points, 11 comments)
    3. Lars and the Real Girl (2007) A sweet yet quirky, socially inept young man develops a uncoventional romantic relationship with a doll he finds on the Internet. / Just finished watching this film, it's absolutely brilliant and original.Ryan Gosling is fantastic. [RT 81% MT 70/100] (85 points, 12 comments)
    4. [SUGGEST] Gone Baby Gone- Ben Affleck's fantastic directorial debut. A crime drama about the search for a missing four year old girl, starring Casey Affleck, Michelle Monaghan and Morgan Freeman. (66 points, 6 comments)
    5. [SUGGEST] A Single Man (2009) Colin Firth, Julianne Moore, Nicholas Hoult - An English professor, one year after the sudden death of his boyfriend, is unable to cope with his typical days in 1960s Los Angeles. (55 points, 3 comments)
    6. An Education (2009) Carey Mulligan and Peter Sarsgaard are fantastic in this coming of age drama about life in 1960s suburban London. Fantastic screenplay from Nick Hornby (High Fidelity,About A Boy) (37 points, 1 comment)
    7. [SUGGEST] Trance (2013) - Fantastic Psychological crime drama from Danny Boyle starring James McAvoy and Rosario Dawson. It's better if you know as little as possible about it. (37 points, 15 comments)
    8. The Kids Are All Right (2010) - Two children conceived by artificial insemination bring their father into their family life. Fantastic cast: Julianne Moore, Annette Bening, Mark Ruffalo, Mia Wasikowska, Josh Hutcherson. (36 points, 4 comments)
    9. The Next Three Days (2010)- A married couple's life is turned upside down when the wife is accused of a murder./ A Heart stopping intriguing thriller starrring Russell Crowe and Elizabeth Banks. (28 points, 5 comments)
  10. 503 points, 1 submission: humdingeries
    1. So nobody need ever ask again. 99 mind-fuck films (503 points, 78 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Tevesh_CKP (563 points, 141 comments)
  2. jupiterkansas (543 points, 157 comments)
  3. WarrenPuff_It (328 points, 39 comments)
  4. Ascarea (257 points, 24 comments)
  5. j1202 (202 points, 58 comments)
  6. John_Moriarty (196 points, 16 comments)
  7. moviesbot (187 points, 98 comments)
  8. nubilis (186 points, 27 comments)
  9. Ymir_from_Venus (183 points, 39 comments)
  10. costofanarchy (175 points, 44 comments)
  11. unzercharlie (144 points, 26 comments)
  12. FaerieStories (136 points, 31 comments)
  13. wigg1es (126 points, 25 comments)
  14. 2udaylatif (125 points, 35 comments)
  15. ThrowingChicken (123 points, 29 comments)
  16. PunkandCannonballer (120 points, 44 comments)
  17. mgraunk (120 points, 38 comments)
  18. sg587565 (116 points, 23 comments)
  19. Keganonymous (115 points, 1 comment)
  20. Pjoernrachzarck (114 points, 16 comments)
  21. Grock23 (113 points, 25 comments)
  22. ctk3927 (113 points, 17 comments)
  23. KorovaMilk113 (110 points, 24 comments)
  24. napjerks (109 points, 20 comments)
  25. entertainman (107 points, 21 comments)
  26. 1337speak (106 points, 43 comments)
  27. Agrees_with_dickhead (105 points, 25 comments)
  28. TheMemoman (104 points, 35 comments)
  29. Julps2 (103 points, 19 comments)
  30. NightSwipe (102 points, 29 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. So nobody need ever ask again. 99 mind-fuck films by humdingeries (503 points, 78 comments)
  2. Need a movie to watch? Here's a huge list of recommendations. by thom168as (225 points, 27 comments)
  3. [SUGGEST] Each year I create a top 20 list to share among friends, I have finally caught up and made my 2016 list, here are all lists since 2012. by unzercharlie (211 points, 37 comments)
  4. [SUGGEST] Whiplash,2014. I can legitimately say that this movie singlehandedly dominated every movies I have ever watched in terms of quality. 2h later and my heart is still pounding like I ran a marathon. 9.8/10 by Nostradamus101 (209 points, 45 comments)
  5. Oldboy (2003) - a dark but compelling South Korean film about a man kidnapped and imprisoned for 15 years. Once released, he begins a quest to find out why. by basisvector (200 points, 32 comments)
  6. [SUGGEST] What We Do In The Shadows. Hilarious mockumentary about the lives of four vampires sharing a house in modern day New Zealand. by htoooh (193 points, 9 comments)
  7. [Request] What movie would you recommend me if all I showed you was this gif? by UnlostHorizon (180 points, 99 comments)
  8. [SUGGEST] Brick (2005) - Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays a high-schooler investigating his girlfriend's disappearance (80% on RT) by b0yakasha (179 points, 18 comments)
  9. Let the Right One In (2008) - an intriguing portrayal of the life of a young vampire girl as she attempts to befriend a local boy. Easily one of the best in the genre. by basisvector (173 points, 27 comments)
  10. [Suggest] Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang - A hilarious homage to the noir genre, Robert Downey Jr. plays an idiot who gets caught in some Hollywood powerplay, gets partnered with Val Kilmer and has to deal with his high school crush Michelle Monaghan with all her baggage. Written and Directed by Shane Black. by Tevesh_CKP (166 points, 13 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 210 points: Ascarea's comment in [Request] What movie would you recommend me if all I showed you was this gif?
  2. 200 points: WarrenPuff_It's comment in Suggest me a movie about the American frontier or a sort of western without cowboys
  3. 134 points: John_Moriarty's comment in If I only showed you this gif, which movie would you recommend?
  4. 115 points: Keganonymous's comment in [Request] What movie would you recommend me if all I showed you was this gif?
  5. 93 points: namemag100's comment in List of some of your darkest, most fucked up, hard to watch movies.
  6. 90 points: cerulean_88's comment in [Request] What movie would you recommend me if all I showed you was this gif?
  7. 82 points: pullopate's comment in [Request] What movie would you recommend me if all I showed you was this gif?
  8. 79 points: novr_'s comment in What movie comes to your mind after seeing this picture?
  9. 76 points: Majestic121's comment in The Intouchables (2011) French film but definitely worth watching
  10. 76 points: basedalaskan's comment in [Request] What movie would you recommend — if all I did was show you this image?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]


2016.10.04 22:11 MsBluffy What's Going on in Columbia? October 4-9

CONTENT COURTESY OF COLUMBIA CVB
 
ON STAGE
 
SPECIAL EVENTS
 
GALLERY
 
 
SPORTS
 
 
LIVE MUSIC
 
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
 
MOVIE GUIDE
THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK – THE TOURING YEARS - Directed by Ron Howard and produced with the full cooperation of Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono and Olivia Harrison, this entertaining and evocative documentary transports us to the 1960s, when The Beatles cemented their reputation as a brilliant live act. The film will focus on the time period from the early Beatles' journey in the days of The Cavern Club in Liverpool to their last concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco in 1966. Their inner workings and astounding musical gifts are revealed through electric, never-before-seen archival materials, including footage exclusive to movie theaters.
THE BIRTH OF A NATION - Set in the antebellum South, Birth of a Nation boldly explores the life and death of Nat Turner, a slave who orchestrated an uprising in 1831. As a young boy, Nat startles his owners by displaying an aptitude for reading. They decide to teach him how to read the Bible. As an adult, Nat (Nate Parker) is a gifted preacher, regularly offering wisdom to his fellow slaves. Nat's owner Samuel (Armie Hammer) encounters hard times and decides to take advantage of Nat's gift. Written and directed by Parker, Birth of a Nation premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, where it won the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award.
DEEPWATER HORIZON - Lone Survivor director Peter Berg helms this docudrama about the true story of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, a 2010 oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico which resulted in the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history. The film depicts the challenges Mike Williams (Mark Wahlberg) and the rest of the rig's crew as they fought for survival.
DON’T BREATHE - Three friends plot to end their money woes by burglarizing the home of a blind recluse (Stephen Lang), but the heist quickly goes awry when they discover that their target is concealing a horrifying secret -- and that he isn't as harmless as they had thought.
EQUITY - In this gripping financial thriller, Anna Gunn (Breaking Bad) stars as a senior investment banker who, despite an impressive track record, is passed over for a promotion at her firm. In response, she tries to take a tech start-up public. But when an employee from that start-up raises questions about the company, she's put in an awkward position. Should she look into those rumors, or push forward, as her bosses would expect?
THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN - A recent divorcee (Emily Blunt) fantasizes about a couple that she passes each day on her commuter train ride. Soon, she becomes entangled in a mystery involving the couple, as well as her former husband and his new family in this adaptation of the 2015 bestseller by Paula Hawkins.
HELL OR HIGH WATER - In West Texas, a divorced father (Chris Pine) struggles to provide for his boys. Desperate, he and his short-tempered, ex-convict brother (Ben Foster) decide to rob a branch of the Texas Midland bank. Then another. They have a plan, but there's a formidable man in their way: Marcus (Jeff Bridges), a Texas Ranger on the verge of retirement.
LIFE, ANIMATED - Life, Animated is a joyous, ebullient take on parenting. But things didn't seem that positive to Ron and Cornelia Suskind when their son Owen completely retreated from the world as a toddler. Diagnosed with severe autism, Owen kept to himself, watching Disney films in the family basement. After years of complete silence from Owen, Ron noticed something familiar in the gibberish that he overheard Owen muttering. Thus began a journey that would come to include a best-selling book and eventually be enshrined in This American Life. Oscar-winning director Roger Ross Williams moves the story to the present day, following Owen as he prepares to move out on his own. Dazzling, expertly crafted, and polished to a fine gloss, this real-life fairytale urges us to seize inspiration when it appears.
THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN - In this remake of the classic 1960 oater of the same name (itself a Western remake of Akira Kurosawa's masterpiece, The Seven Samurai), seven gunslingers join forces in order to protect a small town from a mining tycoon and his goons, who plan to seize the residents' land by force. The seven-man army is led by a mysterious bounty hunter, and also includes a sharp-witted gambler, a troubled ex-Civil War soldier, a mountain man, an expert knife thrower, an outlaw, and a Comanche warrior.
MASTERMINDS - A dim-witted armored-car driver (Zach Galifianakis) is lured into taking part in a massive heist by a seductive co-worker (Kristen Wiig) and her criminal accomplice (Owen Wilson). But when his partners steal the money and betray him, he is forced to evade a police detective (Leslie Jones) and an eccentric hit man (Jason Sudeikis) while seeking his revenge.
MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN - After a family tragedy, a boy (Asa Butterfield) follows a series of clues that lead him to a mysterious orphanage on a remote Welsh island. There, he discovers a community of children with unusual abilities.
SNOWDEN - Oliver Stone directs his attention to the still-unfolding saga of controversial whistleblower Edward Snowden (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) in this biopic depicting how exposing abuses of power at the NSA made Snowden the world's most wanted fugitive.
STORKS - In this wry animated fantasy, a stork (voiced by Andy Samberg) and his human pal must team up to transport a baby girl to her expectant family, even though storks have long since gotten out of the baby delivery business ever since they started working as couriers for an internet merchant.
WHEN THE BOUGH BREAKS - John and Laura Taylor desperately want a baby. After exhausting all other options, they finally hire Anna to be their surrogate - but as she gets further along in her pregnancy, so too does her psychotic and dangerous fixation on the husband.
 
CHECK EACH THEATRE FOR SHOWTIMES
RAGTAG CINEMA – 10 Hitt Street 573-443-4359
REGAL STADIUM 14 THEATER – 2800 Goodwin Pointe Drive 573-817-0770
GOODRICH FORUM 8 – 1209 Forum Katy Parkway 573-445-7469
submitted by MsBluffy to columbiamo [link] [comments]


2016.09.23 16:44 MsBluffy What's Going on in Columbia? September 23-25

CONTENT COURTESY OF COLUMBIA CVB
 
ON STAGE
 
SPECIAL EVENTS
 
GALLERY
 
 
SPORTS
 
 
LIVE MUSIC
 
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
 
MOVIE GUIDE
THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK – THE TOURING YEARS - Directed by Ron Howard and produced with the full cooperation of Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono and Olivia Harrison, this entertaining and evocative documentary transports us to the 1960s, when The Beatles cemented their reputation as a brilliant live act. The film will focus on the time period from the early Beatles' journey in the days of The Cavern Club in Liverpool to their last concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco in 1966. Their inner workings and astounding musical gifts are revealed through electric, never-before-seen archival materials, including footage exclusive to movie theaters.
BLAIR WITCH - A group of college students venture into the Black Hills Forest in Maryland to uncover the mysteries surrounding the disappearance of James’ sister who many believe is connected to the legend of the Blair Witch.
BRIDGET JONES’S BABY - Bridget Jones, now a fortysomething news producer, discovers that she's pregnant. However, she isn't sure if the baby's father is Mark Darcy (Colin Firth), her on-and-off boyfriend, or Jack Qwant (Patrick Dempsey), her new American love interest.
DON’T BREATHE - Three friends plot to end their money woes by burglarizing the home of a blind recluse (Stephen Lang), but the heist quickly goes awry when they discover that their target is concealing a horrifying secret -- and that he isn't as harmless as they had thought.
DON’T THINK TWICE - Miles runs a beloved New York City improv comedy troupe called The Commune, which attracts some of the city's most promising talent, including Sam, her boyfriend Jack and Allison. Years ago, Miles was passed over for a popular television show called Weekend Live, and he's hardly concealed his bitterness. One day, two members of The Commune are called in to audition for Weekend Live.
HELL OR HIGH WATER - In West Texas, a divorced father (Chris Pine) struggles to provide for his boys. Desperate, he and his short-tempered, ex-convict brother (Ben Foster) decide to rob a branch of the Texas Midland bank. Then another. They have a plan, but there's a formidable man in their way: Marcus (Jeff Bridges), a Texas Ranger on the verge of retirement.
INDIGNATION - In 1951, Marcus Messner (Logan Lerman) relocates from Newark, New Jersey to a small, conservative Ohio college. The Korean War is underway, and in order to avoid the draft, this gifted, working class Jewish boy has accepted a scholarship. Marcus is a principled, strong-willed student, as well as an atheist, and he quickly finds himself clashing with the school's intimidating Dean (Tracy Letts) on ideological grounds. Outside of class, the socially naïve Marcus is enamored with an alluring and wealthy classmate (Sarah Gadon). In his directorial debut, James Schamus (a regular creative partner of Ang Lee) expertly adapts a Philip Roth novel while capturing stunning performances from rising stars Lerman and Gadon, as well as veteran playwright-performer Letts.
KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS - The animated fantasy adventure film Kubo and the Two Strings, directed by Travis Knight, tells the tale of Kubo, a Japanese boy who is responsible for his mother. They scrape by until one day the child is visited by an ancient spirit who takes Kubo on a magical adventure involving a struggle for Earth's survival.
THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN - In this remake of the classic 1960 oater of the same name (itself a Western remake of Akira Kurosawa's masterpiece, The Seven Samurai), seven gunslingers join forces in order to protect a small town from a mining tycoon and his goons, who plan to seize the residents' land by force. The seven-man army is led by a mysterious bounty hunter, and also includes a sharp-witted gambler, a troubled ex-Civil War soldier, a mountain man, an expert knife thrower, an outlaw, and a Comanche warrior.
PETE’S DRAGON - After his parents are killed in a car accident, a young boy named Pete (Oakes Fegley) finds an unlikely caregiver in the form of a dragon (whom he dubs "Elliot") living in a forest in the Pacific Northwest. Years later, a forest ranger (Bryce Dallas Howard) discovers Pete and takes him in, but his attempts to adjust to a normal life are complicated by a man (Karl Urban) who wants to hunt down Elliot.
SNOWDEN - Oliver Stone directs his attention to the still-unfolding saga of controversial whistleblower Edward Snowden (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) in this biopic depicting how exposing abuses of power at the NSA made Snowden the world's most wanted fugitive.
STORKS - In this wry animated fantasy, a stork (voiced by Andy Samberg) and his human pal must team up to transport a baby girl to her expectant family, even though storks have long since gotten out of the baby delivery business ever since they started working as couriers for an internet merchant.
SUICIDE SQUAD - Director David Ayer (Fury) takes the helm for this Warner Bros. production adapted from the DC Comics series about a group of super-villains who are given a shot at redemption by embarking on a heroic mission that will most likely mean the death of them all.
SULLY - The story of Chesley Sullenberger, who became a hero after gliding his plane along the water in the Hudson River, saving all of his 155 passengers.
WHEN THE BOUGH BREAKS - John and Laura Taylor desperately want a baby. After exhausting all other options, they finally hire Anna to be their surrogate - but as she gets further along in her pregnancy, so too does her psychotic and dangerous fixation on the husband.
 
CHECK EACH THEATRE FOR SHOWTIMES
RAGTAG CINEMA – 10 Hitt Street 573-443-4359
REGAL STADIUM 14 THEATER – 2800 Goodwin Pointe Drive 573-817-0770
GOODRICH FORUM 8 – 1209 Forum Katy Parkway 573-445-7469
submitted by MsBluffy to columbiamo [link] [comments]


2016.09.15 15:42 MsBluffy What's Going on in Columbia? September 15-18

CONTENT COURTESY OF COLUMBIA CVB
 
ON STAGE
 
SPECIAL EVENTS
 
GALLERY
 
 
SPORTS
 
 
LIVE MUSIC
 
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
 
MOVIE GUIDE
BAD MOMS - Three overstressed, overworked moms decide to blow off their responsibilities and have some fun, but their wild ways cause them to clash with a rival mommy who's dedicated to preserving the facade of her perfect life.
THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK – THE TOURING YEARS - Directed by Ron Howard and produced with the full cooperation of Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono and Olivia Harrison, this entertaining and evocative documentary transports us to the 1960s, when The Beatles cemented their reputation as a brilliant live act. The film will focus on the time period from the early Beatles' journey in the days of The Cavern Club in Liverpool to their last concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco in 1966. Their inner workings and astounding musical gifts are revealed through electric, never-before-seen archival materials, including footage exclusive to movie theaters.
BLAIR WITCH - A group of college students venture into the Black Hills Forest in Maryland to uncover the mysteries surrounding the disappearance of James’ sister who many believe is connected to the legend of the Blair Witch.
BRIDGET JONES’S BABY - Bridget Jones, now a fortysomething news producer, discovers that she's pregnant. However, she isn't sure if the baby's father is Mark Darcy (Colin Firth), her on-and-off boyfriend, or Jack Qwant (Patrick Dempsey), her new American love interest.
DON’T BREATHE - Three friends plot to end their money woes by burglarizing the home of a blind recluse (Stephen Lang), but the heist quickly goes awry when they discover that their target is concealing a horrifying secret -- and that he isn't as harmless as they had thought.
DON’T THINK TWICE - Miles runs a beloved New York City improv comedy troupe called The Commune, which attracts some of the city's most promising talent, including Sam, her boyfriend Jack and Allison. Years ago, Miles was passed over for a popular television show called Weekend Live, and he's hardly concealed his bitterness. One day, two members of The Commune are called in to audition for Weekend Live.
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS - In this marvelous new comedy, Meryl Streep stars as Florence Foster Jenkins, a New York heiress and socialite with dreams of becoming a legendary opera singer. When Jenkins sings, she hears beautiful sounds; to others, however, her passionately performed notes are hilariously off key. Jenkins' beloved husband/manager (Hugh Grant) protects her from the truth, but when, in a perverse twist, she's asked to perform at Carnegie Hall in 1944, he's faced with a major challenge. Based on a true story, Florence Foster Jenkins is the latest film from Stephen Frears (Philomena).
HELL OR HIGH WATER - In West Texas, a divorced father (Chris Pine) struggles to provide for his boys. Desperate, he and his short-tempered, ex-convict brother (Ben Foster) decide to rob a branch of the Texas Midland bank. Then another. They have a plan, but there's a formidable man in their way: Marcus (Jeff Bridges), a Texas Ranger on the verge of retirement.
INDIGNATION - In 1951, Marcus Messner (Logan Lerman) relocates from Newark, New Jersey to a small, conservative Ohio college. The Korean War is underway, and in order to avoid the draft, this gifted, working class Jewish boy has accepted a scholarship. Marcus is a principled, strong-willed student, as well as an atheist, and he quickly finds himself clashing with the school's intimidating Dean (Tracy Letts) on ideological grounds. Outside of class, the socially naïve Marcus is enamored with an alluring and wealthy classmate (Sarah Gadon). In his directorial debut, James Schamus (a regular creative partner of Ang Lee) expertly adapts a Philip Roth novel while capturing stunning performances from rising stars Lerman and Gadon, as well as veteran playwright-performer Letts.
KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS - The animated fantasy adventure film Kubo and the Two Strings, directed by Travis Knight, tells the tale of Kubo, a Japanese boy who is responsible for his mother. They scrape by until one day the child is visited by an ancient spirit who takes Kubo on a magical adventure involving a struggle for Earth's survival.
THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS - An Australian World War I veteran (Michael Fassbender) takes a job a lighthouse keeper on an isolated island. He meets his future wife (Alicia Vikander) at the nearest coastal town, and two begin their new life alone at the lighthouse. Once settled, a lifeboat washes ashore with a newborn inside and the couple raise the infant as their own.
MORGAN - A mysterious artificial being evolves faster than anticipated, and a corporate consultant (Kate Mara) is enlisted to help determine the test subject's fate. After "Morgan" attacks one of her creators, the group is pressed into a decision.
PETE’S DRAGON - After his parents are killed in a car accident, a young boy named Pete (Oakes Fegley) finds an unlikely caregiver in the form of a dragon (whom he dubs "Elliot") living in a forest in the Pacific Northwest. Years later, a forest ranger (Bryce Dallas Howard) discovers Pete and takes him in, but his attempts to adjust to a normal life are complicated by a man (Karl Urban) who wants to hunt down Elliot.
SNOWDEN - Oliver Stone directs his attention to the still-unfolding saga of controversial whistleblower Edward Snowden (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) in this biopic depicting how exposing abuses of power at the NSA made Snowden the world's most wanted fugitive.
SOUTHSIDE WITH YOU - In the summer of 1989, a young attorney named Barack Obama (Parker Sawyer) meets another attorney named Michelle Robinson (Tika Sumpter). He convinces her to go on a date. Inspired by the real story of the Obamas' first date, Richard Tanne's sweet, charming and sensitive debut follows them on that eventful day, as they experience art (including a screening of Do the Right Thing) and walk around Chicago, getting to know one another.
SUICIDE SQUAD - Director David Ayer (Fury) takes the helm for this Warner Bros. production adapted from the DC Comics series about a group of super-villains who are given a shot at redemption by embarking on a heroic mission that will most likely mean the death of them all.
SULLY - The story of Chesley Sullenberger, who became a hero after gliding his plane along the water in the Hudson River, saving all of his 155 passengers.
WHEN THE BOUGH BREAKS - John and Laura Taylor desperately want a baby. After exhausting all other options, they finally hire Anna to be their surrogate - but as she gets further along in her pregnancy, so too does her psychotic and dangerous fixation on the husband.
 
CHECK EACH THEATRE FOR SHOWTIMES
RAGTAG CINEMA – 10 Hitt Street 573-443-4359
REGAL STADIUM 14 THEATER – 2800 Goodwin Pointe Drive 573-817-0770
GOODRICH FORUM 8 – 1209 Forum Katy Parkway 573-445-7469
submitted by MsBluffy to columbiamo [link] [comments]


2016.08.16 19:09 RandomActsOfMusic Joseph Gordon-Levitt and HitRecord have requested r/RandomActsOfMusic's participation in "Everyday, Spectacular"!

Hey Community!
We have some great, albeit last minute, news.
Joseph Gordon-Levitt - actor, several-time Reddit AMA participant, random subway musician - and his community project HitRECord are specifically looking for our participation!
This project is called Everyday, Spectacular and its spirit is exactly about what we try to capture here at Random Acts of Music.
Here's what Joe has to say about the project:
I want to challenge musicians, singers, dancers, and performers of any kind to go into an ordinary setting, and make a spectacular moment out of that everyday situation. You can sing, dance, play around, dress up in costumes, do any kind of extraordinary activity. These performances will be recorded from the standpoint of a passerby. So in the end, we’ll have a big, vibrant, beautiful, spectacular, collaborative piece of art.
The submission deadline is tomorrow August 17, so jump on it!
Follow this link https://hitrecord.org/projects/2940194/highlights and see if there's any way you can contribute!
Also - Joe and the HitRECord team have several more exciting and similar projects in the works. It's very likely we'll partner up in the future, so if we can show what we can do in 24 hours, it'll help bring more awesome people (and eyeballs) to our community. Get excited everyone, big things are happening!
A photo from Joe saying "Hi" should be coming our way soon as well.
submitted by RandomActsOfMusic to randomactsofmusic [link] [comments]


2016.04.27 04:00 Mcheetah2 Fixing the DC Cinematic Universe and Justice League movies

(This is my first time posting on here, but I love movies and storytelling and am glad I found this subreddit. Anyways, bare with me; I'm a newbie.)
I think the whole DC Cinematic Universe should be taking the best of what already works and merging it all together. And I think they should take their time in setting things up, unlike what Warner Bros is doing in real life.
I feel they should begin by combining/tweaking/retconning the Christopher Reeves Superman universe (maybe even picking up from Superman Returns, but possibly with a new actor instead Brandon Routh) with the Nolan universe. And while I am not a huge fan of the Reeves universe (it's too campy), I am only saying this because they should just use what is already established and works with audiences in order save time. These universes can co-exist, but it doesn't mean the movies have to share the same tone. Metropolis can be light-hearted and fun, while Gotham is gritty and realistic. That will make the universe-crossovers more exciting because they are not all the same tone, but will share bits and pieces of each other in the Justice League to all work cohesively. We'll establish that the show Arrow already exists in this world (although I don't like or watch it).
CASTING
So basically...
Step 1. Make a new Superman movie in 2013. Don't do a reboot; just "update" things a bit, both in story, visuals and all. So it'd be more like a "rebootquel" to Superman Returns. Make Brainiac the villain and introduce Supergirl (Chelan Simmons as Kara Zor-El). Use Henry Cavill or Brandon Routh; I don't care. Keep Kevin Spacey as Lex Luthor (just make him more serious). This will be to update Superman into the post-Nolan universe and make it more realistic as the Nolan version of Gotham City (but still as light-hearted as the first two Reeves Superman movies). Hint of Darkseid coming to Earth at the post-credits scene. Basically, this can be summed up with "Make a Superman movie that isn't Zack Synder's 'Man of Steel' and make it FUN!"
Step 2. Make a Wonder Woman movie for 2014 (use anyone but Gal Gadot). Pretty much, do a live-action version of the 2009 animated Wonder Woman, which was pretty much a perfect Wonder Woman movie, as is. In this universe, the animated movie never existed because it's now liVe-action. The movie will be a perfect blend of the Nolan trilogy "realism" with the light-hearted elements of the Superman cinematic universe. So basically, "less realistic than the Batman trilogy, but more fun." Cast 5'10 1/2" Canadian stuntwoman Monique Ganderton as Wonder Woman; she's utterly perfect for the role. Even keep Nathan Fillion in it! The main villain in this movie is Ares the God of War; get Joe Manganiello to play him. Hint at Darkside, off on some far planet, in the post credits scene. Show him for the first time.
Step 3. Debut a television series for The Flash for Fall 2014. It can be the current CW one or a new (and better) one. I don't care. But The Flash they use should be old enough to comfortably fit in with the other actors, not a teenaged character that the CW normally uses. This same actor will play in the movies, bridging the TV and cinematic universes together as well as making the TV series matter a lot more since it will be the fans first introduction into the events of the Justice League movies.
Step 4. Make a Batman and Joker team-up movie for Summer 2015. It can either be this or "Batman and the Suicide Squad." Making a full-out Suicide Squad will be a lot and will interfere in the planned Wonder Woman sequel for 2016, so it could just be The Joker and Harley Quinn. Use Christian Bale as Batman and keep it in the Nolan universe (in this scenario, both Bale and Nolan are fine with making more movies). Debut Robin (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) in this. DON'T use that super-shitty Jared Leto "Juggalo" Joker. Although Heath Ledger dies, this would be the same Joker from The Dark Knight (who they never showed what happened to, in the movie; they never showed him dying or getting locked up). Introduce Harley Quinn in this movie, as well. Keep Margot Robbie as Harley, I guess; I don't care. Have Diana Prince/Wonder Woman cameo in Gotham City at or near the end.
Step 5. Make season 2 of The Flash television series an entire Flashpoint Paradox story arc for Fall 2015, including the alternate Thomas Wayne Batman. This will set him up for the Justice League by season's end.
Step 6. Make a Wonder Woman "Justice League test-run" sequel movie for May 2016 with Wonder Woman as the main protagonist, showing she can hold her own with the big boys. It will be a "Justice League" test-run (just like the Captain America sequels are unofficial Avengers sequels). The plot will be Wonder Woman facing off against an unofficial/mini Injustice League or Legion of Doom and needing Batman and his partner(s) to help her. Make the villains Gorilla Grodd (CGI), Cheetah (Jaime Murray or Lena Headey), possibly Circe (Deborah Ann Woll), and Giganta (Gina Carano with red hair). Maybe add in Solomon Grundy, as well. Kevin Spacey as Lex Luthor will cameo as the one financing their whole operation, and he also serves as a way to get Superman involved. The team of villains will be too much for Wonder Woman to do alone, so Batman and Robin will come in to help her. In the third act, Superman will make a surprise entrance (kept a surprise from the internet and never shown in any trailers) and assist them against the bigger villains like Garganta. Once these smaller villains are subdued and Wonder Woman finally gets to work with Batman and Superman (in the third act), we'll end by showing Darkside entering our Solar System, immediately setting up the 2017 Justice League movie.
Step 7. On TV, The Flash and Cyborg will become buddies, as will Green Arrow and Batgirl, then they'll crossover with each other. Season three of the Flash TV show will have him teaming up with Cyborg, while Arrow will debut the character of Barbara Gordon (Karen Gillan) in a plot line. The two hero couples will be setting up their own pre-Justice League alliance. Batgirl will be the glue to allow Arrow, Flash and Cyborg to eventually meet Batman and that will eventually allow them to join the Justice League.
Step 8. The Justice League movie for May 2017! Darkside comes to Earth, fucks up EVERYTHING and only the Justice League can stop them! Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Flash (TV), Green Arrow (TV), Robin, and the cinematic debuts of Cyborg and Batgirl. Maybe Supergirl would join in, too. We'll leave Aquaman out of this, for now. Wonder Woman and Superman will be working together early on in the film before Darkside's arrival to Earth and Batman and Robin will allow Batgirl to join their team and she will allow Batman and Robin to meet The Flash, his buddy Cyborg, and Green Arrow. So Superman and Wonder Woman's partnership and Batman/Robin/Batgirl/Flash/Cyborg/Green Arrow will merge with them and voilà! Justice League formed in order to stop the Earth-wide threat of Darkseid!
Post Justice League. The heroes will go back to their respective universes and do more movies and TV shows with an established shared universe together. Superman and Supergirl will go back to Metropolis (DC franchise #1), and Batman, Robin, and Batgirl can do their own thing in Gotham City (DC franchise #2) and maybe even potentially set up a Batgirl and/or Nightwing solo TV series (DC franchise #2.5). The Flash will go back to TV (DC franchise #3), as will Green Arrow (DC franchise #4), Wonder Woman will do her third movie for 2018 (DC franchise #5), and Cyborg might spin-off into a Teen Titans movie for 2019 (DC franchise #6).
We've now made a Justice League movie and six other DC franchises in five years without rushing a damn thing or shitting the bed, Zack Snyder style. And we haven't even gotten to Aquaman or Martian Manhunter, yet.
Thoughts?
submitted by Mcheetah2 to fixingmovies [link] [comments]


2015.12.13 01:10 tabbouleh_rasa I'd like to discuss Comet (2014) and in particular Justin Long's sublimely awful performance [SPOILERS]

After having watched a few episodes of Mr. Robot I was curious to check out Sam Esmail's previous work. Where did he come from and what had he made to land a job as a show runner for one of the sleeper hits of the season?
So I watched Comet and I was blown away. With almost Tarantino-esque ability to obviously draw upon influences while making them his own, while still paying homage to the source but subtly enough not to be pastiche, Comet has wonderful cinematography, a stimulating experimental sequencing in narrative, naturally engaging dialogue (the "where's my money?" bits are great) and a tour de force performance from... Emmy Rossum.
But I can't even explain how bad Justin Long is in this.
I don't have the words. It's almost so bad that it adds an entirely new dimension to the film.
By extension Long's character Dell is eminently hatable, which is appropriate because most of the scenes in Comet are actually about the deterioration of a relationship. Moments where Justin Long and Emmy Rossum's chemistry do shine (almost entirely shouldered by Emmy Rossum as her character Kimberly's ability to fall for Dell border on disbelief) are rare - and this is in a sense the thesis of the film - that the moments that really shine in a relationship are rare but as brief as they are they stand out like lights in the dark, murky, bitter waters of recollection.
It's like the script was self-aware of Justin Long's acting and played to it. When all the script calls for is for Dell to be played straight, Justin Long is stiff and wooden to an almost Keanu Reeves degree, but whereas Keanu can make it work by being able to brood Justin Long just can't. So the script compensates by making Dell's character incapable of existing in any sort of serious moment without cracking some sort of bad joke.
When Justin Long is asked to display emotion he just overacts, so Dell ends up being written like a petulant, obnoxious child. His character is supposed to be "comfortable with being miserable" but instead what we get is a neurotic mess of perpetual discomfort, even during moments of joy.
But it works. Because unlike say, 500 Days of Summer where Joseph Gordon-Levitt's charm overpowers the cynical underlying idea shared by Comet which is that selective memory can distort the truth of any given moment, Dell is so insufferable that we can't help but empathise more from Kimberly's perspective. And one of the things that Kimberly says is that she "needed [her relationship with Dell] in order to love something that was not good on paper", that is, the kind of love Kimberly found with Dell was unconditional.
Moreover the roles are reversed, and I'm pretty sure since Comet shares similar tricks of non-linear editing with 500 Days of Summer that it is at least partially inspired by that movie: whereas in 500 Days of Summer it's JGL's Tom who is more of the romantic, in Comet Dell is a faux-cynic who tries to hide his vulnerability by boldly proclaiming that he doesn't believe in love, a lie that is corrected at the end of the movie by Emmy Rossum's Kimberly.
And it works! Because it's fucking Justin Long! How the hell are we supposed to believe Justin Long proclaim that he doesn't believe in love when the bulk of his acting experience is in not only comedies, but romantic comedies?
And the thing is, you can really see him try. Despite his best efforts though he's just so bad. He so badly wants to be a dramatic actor, but the movie somehow compensates for his inability to act dramatically to make a really quite interesting, lovable, albeit pathetic character. Of course, the script has to force together a barely developed "genius kid who invents drug to save his own mom" backstory but of course this is swiftly cut down in the end (like I said SPOILERS) when the movie reveals that quite possibly one of the side effects of the drug his company invented lead to a heart attack a few years down the line. It reinforces one of the ideas of Comet which is that you can't ever really predict how one moment will lead to, or inform, the next... even ones very far down the line.
Because the important difference between 500 Days and Comet is that 500 Days is constructed of many, many little moments of a relationship while Comet is only focused on just a few important moments. Even though minutes are spliced into one another, there are clearly just three or four major events that are being depicted: when they met, when they got together, when they broke up, when they got together for a second time, and when they broke up for a second time. This of course only comes clear in the end, but the jumbled mess is exactly like how memory works and it's even alluded to in the film as a dream.
Whereas Summer and Tom in 500 Days is about communication and expectations - about how Summer made it clear that she wasn't really serious about Tom and how his anger at their fate is unjustified - Comet is much less one sided, as not only do Kimberly and Dell get much more serious (getting back together after a few years and having to struggle with the same problems of late adult commitment as Master of None's Dev and Rachel) but each party breaks up with each other once. Moreover, the ending of Comet is far more uncertain than the ending of 500 Days but I don't know if that's to the movie's credit.
If it's unclear by now I think Kimberly should definitely not have gotten back with Dell, and I think the general arc of the movie supports this conclusion. Comet is celebrating the success of an ended relationship where both partners have grown as human beings.
Or well, maybe at least one.
So what does truefilm think? And has there ever been an instance in your viewings where a movie is not only able to compensate for a bad performance, but somehow make it uniquely a part of the film and use it to add to the film?
submitted by tabbouleh_rasa to TrueFilm [link] [comments]